#1
Do any of you know where I can find a lesson for Reggae/Punk/Ska/Rock bass playing?
BRIGHT LIGHTS PUT ME IN A TRANCE.
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#3
Westbound Train. Great band. Learn from them.
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Quote by Applehead
There are some things in life that are universally "good":

Sex, pizza, the smell of fresh washing and slap bass.
#5
You really need to know your scales and how to compose walking basslines to fit with the song.
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#6
I learnt to play reggae basslines by caning Bob Marley records. Reggae is a feeling though, the rhythm is the most important part. You can make a decent reggae bassline with two notes if you get the rhythm right.

Just get a few books, listen to some records and get the feel of how they make basslines, then copy and mould to your own style
#7
Catch 22 has some amazing basslines. If you can find a lesson for their bass style anywhere I'd look at that.
#8
for skate, i look at the aquabats and less than jake. sublime have some pretty cool reggae style songs too
#9
From what I've heard, ska basslines tend to be quite similar to jazz basslines. If you know anything about jazz basslines, I'd work from there. In fact, I'm listening to one right now, and it sounds like one that I'd hear in jazz band. Mainly scales.
#11
Well I already listen to a lot of what you guys have told me to listen to but I'm looking for actual lessons. Like what types of scales.

Btw, what is walking? I've heard people say it before but I probably already know how to do it but what does it actually mean?
BRIGHT LIGHTS PUT ME IN A TRANCE.
but it aint house music that makes me want to dance.
#13
Quote by salemboicot
I use sublime heaps, maybe for ska you could try madness, does reel big fish count?

I agree with madness and RBF. I suppose they do count, it's more ska punk but still got some pretty cool lines.
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#16
Check out Catch22 and Streetlight Manifesto. You won't be disappointed. Ska is a lot harder to play than punk though. Punk is pretty damn easy.
#17
Quote by Ranxston
Check out Catch22 and Streetlight Manifesto. You won't be disappointed. Ska is a lot harder to play than punk though. Punk is pretty damn easy.



I agree with this 100%....but ska basslines are usually not too hard anyway.
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Quote by Applehead
There are some things in life that are universally "good":

Sex, pizza, the smell of fresh washing and slap bass.
#18
Quote by Ranxston
Check out Catch22 and Streetlight Manifesto. You won't be disappointed. Ska is a lot harder to play than punk though. Punk is pretty damn easy.



Yeah, they're my two of my favorite bands. So far that activebass.com is working pretty good.
BRIGHT LIGHTS PUT ME IN A TRANCE.
but it aint house music that makes me want to dance.
#19
Quote by Confused4930
I agree with this 100%....but ska basslines are usually not too hard anyway.


Yeah they are easy, but I mean there's a huge gap between ska and punk in difficulty.
#20
Quote by LittleMan_LittlePenis
Btw, what is walking? I've heard people say it before but I probably already know how to do it but what does it actually mean?


It's basically using notes from the chord that the guitar playing is using and keeping a steady beat (or at least that's my interpretation of it). For example, if it were a C chord, you could do something like C-E-G-C and work from there.
#21
Quote by Hergiswi
It's basically using notes from the chord that the guitar playing is using and keeping a steady beat (or at least that's my interpretation of it). For example, if it were a C chord, you could do something like C-E-G-C and work from there.



Basically a non stop run? (No pun intended...)
BRIGHT LIGHTS PUT ME IN A TRANCE.
but it aint house music that makes me want to dance.
#22
Take the guitar chords, arpeggiate them, and turn that into a walking bass line. Throw in some syncopation and little craps like that, and you have a nice ska bassline.
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Quote by Applehead
There are some things in life that are universally "good":

Sex, pizza, the smell of fresh washing and slap bass.
#23
Start with the root note as usual..and walk the notes..thats the bare basics of a walking bassline..but unless you know scales and modes and shit it's pretty difficult to put together a complex walking bassline (a none stop one or a good repeating one). Just listen to alot of Reggae and ska and get the feel it'll come to you..but knowing your scales like mentioned will help you out alot. A lot of the times you're just repeating the notes with good rythem and it sounds tricky but isn't all that complex when you get it down

don't know if that helps at all but I tried..
#24
Quote by LittleMan_LittlePenis

Btw, what is walking? I've heard people say it before but I probably already know how to do it but what does it actually mean?


Quote by Hergiswi
It's basically using notes from the chord that the guitar playing is using and keeping a steady beat (or at least that's my interpretation of it). For example, if it were a C chord, you could do something like C-E-G-C and work from there.


It's a bit more than that really. "Walking" basslines, commonly used in Jazz music, are characterised by approach tones, usually chromatic, sometimes whole steps. Basically, you get a chord chart with the progression on, and the basics of it is to "walk" up to the root note at each change by using a note a semi-tone or tone below it. This is why Jazz is so improvisational. You never really see a jazz bassist with a score of what he is going to play, he just needs to know the chord changes and he can work from that.

it takes skill, one which i have yet to acquire to a high level.

Fbsa is into Jazz stuff if you're interestd in more. Have a look at the "beginning on jazz" thread..
#25
Quote by Applehead
It's a bit more than that really. "Walking" basslines, commonly used in Jazz music, are characterised by approach tones, usually chromatic, sometimes whole steps. Basically, you get a chord chart with the progression on, and the basics of it is to "walk" up to the root note at each change by using a note a semi-tone or tone below it. This is why Jazz is so improvisational. You never really see a jazz bassist with a score of what he is going to play, he just needs to know the chord changes and he can work from that.

it takes skill, one which i have yet to acquire to a high level.

Fbsa is into Jazz stuff if you're interestd in more. Have a look at the "beginning on jazz" thread..


Applehead, you beat me to the punch! Damn those time zones.

I am leaning more towards Jazz lately in my bass education and its not easy but rewarding. The only other thing I would add to the above is that a consciousness about chord progression and construction becomes important when you build your basslines "on the fly" and determine the note progressions from the root. To be very good you have to have this ingrained deeply in your knowledge and playing. My current teacher refuses to give any sort of written out bass line for me and while it was hard as hell at first its getting easier each week.

The other part that is so important in walking basslines is your time signature and your overall timing.

If you can nail these down, walking bass lines in reggae, ska, blues or jazz become a whole lot easier.

Now if I could only get my husband to like ska...I've been itching to play the Israelites since this thread went up.
#26
Ah, I was hoping somebody would be able to explain it better than I could. I actually play jazz frequently, but I'm horrible at giving explanations. =P
#27
Quote by Ranxston
Yeah they are easy, but I mean there's a huge gap between ska and punk in difficulty.

That's because 50% of punk bands don't really know how to play their instruments.

If you want a REALLY good bassist, check out Matt Freeman from Rancid. Absolutely incredible bassplayer. He really knows his instrument.
#28
Yeah I was generalizing, there are exceptions. Matt Freeman is really good, I still have to play Maxwell Murder.
#29
Quote by Ranxston
Check out Catch22 and Streetlight Manifesto. You won't be disappointed. Ska is a lot harder to play than punk though. Punk is pretty damn easy.


theres alot of punk bands with really tough bass lines
#30
i think ska and reggae is definately a lot more fun than punk. punk a lot of the time is just the typical same note after same note.

well anyway. some good bands are streetlight manifesto, reel big fish, catch 22, sublime, bob marley, peter tosh, oar, and whole wheat bread
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#31
Josh Ansley might be one of my favorite bassists of all time....it's a shame he's not with Streetlight or Catch 22 anymore
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Quote by Applehead
There are some things in life that are universally "good":

Sex, pizza, the smell of fresh washing and slap bass.
#32
Madness, The Specials and the whole second wave ska bit are good for walking bass lines
#33
Quote by Confused4930
Josh Ansley might be one of my favorite bassists of all time....it's a shame he's not with Streetlight or Catch 22 anymore


I find his story pretty funny. He left Catch 22 because he wanted to be an actor, later he joined Streetlight, once again he left because he wanted to be an actor and today he plays in a metal band called Hurt. I think its a sign lol.
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#34
i have a bunch of punk/ska bassline lessons at activebass.com in the punk section
they are the ones by matt herzog.
#35
On the note of walking bass lines, they usually have a very steady beat (often only quarter notes with the occasional 8th note pair on the weaker beats(2nd and 4th). Because it is the strongest beat, the 1st beat usually gets the root note, and because it is also very strong the 3rd beat often gets a note from the actual chord. The 2nd and 4th beats are weaker and therefore are much more likely to be chromatic. All of this only works under the assumption that you are play in a 4-based time signature.

Hope that helped, I'm not a very good teacher, but that's my 2 cents.
"If faith is the answer we've already reached it
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#36
Quote by anarkee
Applehead, you beat me to the punch! Damn those time zones.

I am leaning more towards Jazz lately in my bass education and its not easy but rewarding. The only other thing I would add to the above is that a consciousness about chord progression and construction becomes important when you build your basslines "on the fly" and determine the note progressions from the root. To be very good you have to have this ingrained deeply in your knowledge and playing. My current teacher refuses to give any sort of written out bass line for me and while it was hard as hell at first its getting easier each week.

The other part that is so important in walking basslines is your time signature and your overall timing.

If you can nail these down, walking bass lines in reggae, ska, blues or jazz become a whole lot easier.

Now if I could only get my husband to like ska...I've been itching to play the Israelites since this thread went up.


Learning to play walking basslines is a tough thing to learn, and once you stop doing it, it's a hard thing to get back. I haven't played with anyone in almost 3 months now (depressed) and I know my bass playing is suffering for it, I can tell everytime I pick it up.

However, once you get the timing, and knowledge down you can apply it to any style of music to create great basslines. It works very, very well in rock music, gives the music more spice.
#37
for the ska and regge type stuff try takin a look at some latin jazz type stuff cuz thats what ska and regge were kinda derived from
#39
I'd say a five string, especially if you tune it EADGC. With walking basslines, more options is always more fun, IMO. =D
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#40
basically, just download alot of ska and reggae, and learn the songs.
also go for alot of rancid.

the way i learned to play bass was learning alot of rancid songs (which incorporate walking basslines)

then i moved onto ska such as streetlight, less than jake, rbf, etc.
reggae, you can basically just improvise wonce you have ska down. just think up a really nice grove that fits the song.

also if ya'll could crit my bass playing from the band in my sig, it would be much apreciated.
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