#1
my question is what does layering do to the sound of the recording and is it worth doing? if it is worth doing, how do you do it on cubase le?
#2
I dont no how to do it on cubase but i no wat it does. It makes the guitars sound heavyer and more in your face!
#3
You record the same parts multiple times to layer. And you will get a bigger sounding track. It can help significantly if done well.
#4
Yeah it helps getting a fuller sounds, esp. if you pan the tracks hard right and left, and use different tones.
#5
layering definatly helps thicken up the sound if you do it right. however, if your timing isnt good one one of the takes it can sound really awful. i like to layer rhythm guitar to add a bit of depth to the backing of the song. i record both takes (or all 3, 4, etc) to a metronome and then i usually pan them differently. so sometimes one is centered and the other is doubled and panned to each side. other times the 2 are just to opposite sides. or just panned different degrees to the same side, or whatever is best for the song.

i hear that recording vocals multiple times and layering them gives a very nice sound, but my singing isnt consistent enough to do that so i dont really know first hand.
#6
Quote by jof1029
layering definatly helps thicken up the sound if you do it right. however, if your timing isnt good one one of the takes it can sound really awful. i like to layer rhythm guitar to add a bit of depth to the backing of the song. i record both takes (or all 3, 4, etc) to a metronome and then i usually pan them differently. so sometimes one is centered and the other is doubled and panned to each side. other times the 2 are just to opposite sides. or just panned different degrees to the same side, or whatever is best for the song.

i hear that recording vocals multiple times and layering them gives a very nice sound, but my singing isnt consistent enough to do that so i dont really know first hand.
Very good points here. Be sure to stay on time otherwise it will fall apart. And for vocal doubling, just listen to any Offspring post 97. Dexter Holland, never less than 4 layers of the same vocal.
#7
Another sexual example of layering vocals in my opinion is Elliott Smith. You can tell the double tracking on his recordings.
There is poetry in despair.
#8
Apparently a lot of the songs on REM's first album (Murmur) had as many as 15 (???!?)layers of the same guitar part, it sounds great but that's probably overkill, but if you are solid enough to play the part the same 3 or 4 times you can really smooth out the sound, but you might have to take the best take and make that layer a lot louder than the rest if you want the part to sound a bit better defined - it's easy to mush the whole thing up if you're not careful. Some guitar parts can also be split into several pieces and recorded separately, eg, there might be a chord in the part that you want to ring out for longer.