#1
As title reads, what chord progressions are great over the hormonic minor scale or chords in paticular.Thanks in advance.
#2
The major chord that corresponds to the Phrygian Dominant interval, I think it's the 4th.
#3
Quote by CowboyUp
The major chord that corresponds to the Phrygian Dominant interval, I think it's the 4th.
It's five.

Anyway, the most common way of using harmonic minor in popular music is to use the V chord in a minor key. For example, if you were in A minor, you would play E instead of E minor. A common chord progression is Am G F E. You would use regular A minor over Am, G, and F, and then A harmonic minor over E.
#5
minor 7th work as well.
Youtube covers

[url="http://www.youtube.com/user/MrJumboHumbo[/URL"]
#6
The triads built in the harmonic minor scale are:

Major Diminished Augmented Minor Major Major Diminished, or i ii* bIII+ iv V bVI vii*

* being the diminished sign which I cannot access right now.


EDIT First being minor Thanks to the person two below me.
Last edited by kirbyrocknroll at Feb 13, 2007,
#7
The harmonic minor scale doesn't really fit any one chord specifically because the scale has atleast one 'avoid' note that will sound dissonant if you hold it over a specific chord - outside of classical and folk music, it's sometimes played over a minor ii - V - I. Either the iiø - V7alt - i-Δ or iiø - V7b9 - i-Δ, but the most common place to see it is played over a fragment of that ii - V7b9 - i-Δ progression, specifically the V7b9 - ii part. Any V7b9 chord resolving to a minor chord a fifth below is a common place to see it - for example playing G Phrygian Domiant over G7b9 and C harmonic minor over C-Δ.

What I mean about avoid notes is unlike more conventional scales - every chord you can build from it has one note that's in the scale that will sound wrong if you hold it over the chord, take the iiø - V7b9 - ii-Δ in C harmonic minor for instance.

C Harmonic Minor = C - D - Eb - F - G - Ab - B.

Dø = D - F - Ab - C. Holding the minor third over C harmonic minor (Minor ninth of D Locrian 6), Eb - creates a minor ninth interval with the tonic of the Dø chord which is considered a dissonant interval. Hold the Eb over Dø and you'll know why. The B note in C harmonic minor might also be considered dissonant if you hold it over the chord.

G7b9 = G - B - D - F - Ab. We have the same situation here with the C note from C harmonic minor (Perfect fourth of G Phrygian dominant). It creates a minor ninth interval with the major third (B) of G Phrygian dominant. Eb also sounds dissonant held against G7b9.

C-Δ = C - Eb - G - B. Hold the Ab note over this chord and you have another example of an avoid note in the C harmonic minor scale.

The scale doesn't perfectly fit every chord built within the scale - atleast one note is going to give you a bad sound if its held against the chord, so the scale isn't individual to any one chord which explains its seldom use outside classical and folk music.

But there are some examples of it in use for you.

#8
Quote by kirbyrocknroll
The triads built in the harmonic minor scale are:

Major Diminished Augmented Minor Major Major Diminished, or i ii* bIII+ iv V bVI vii*

* being the diminished sign which I cannot access right now.


The first chord is actually minor:

minor - diminished - augmented - minor - major - major - diminished
Summer Sale: Save 20% on Jam Tracks or Exotica. Save 30% when you buy both. Sale ends September 4th.
www.UnderTheGroove.com