#1
i know that they hold a current.......but what are they for? i mean like in Carvin catalogs it has capacitors for tone and volume.....idk what thats supposed to do
UG's HIPPIE
#2
if you have an AC voltage source (aka, your pickups), capacitors will transform the signal. Rather than a very smooth sin wave, they will make it more of a saw-toothed pattern. This altered pattern adds new tones to your sound. I really haven't looked at Fourier analysis enough to give you a better description.
#4
All you really need to know is that they bleed off treble by sending high frequencies to the ground. You can use a .001mf cap on your volume, which not many people do. This allows the tone of the guitar to still stay bright as you turn the volume down, as it lets some high frequencies still come through. I myself will be putting some of these on my double neck, as well as a choice in capacitors on each tone top (part of the trying to emulate different guitars in one plan)
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#5
thanks...but i have a buttload of capacitors from all the electroncis i've taken apart and all of them dont have like .01 on them...just large numbers like 203, 103, 250 like that...what do the numbers mean?
UG's HIPPIE
#6
they're manufacturer part numbers- have nothing to do with the value.
Quote by corduroyEW
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#8
Quote by tubab0y
they're manufacturer part numbers- have nothing to do with the value.

No...

For example a "104" is a .1uF capacitor. How do we know?
The first two numbers are the significant digits. "10"
The last number is the multiplier. So if it's got a 4, you add 4 0s.
"100,000"
That's the capacitance in pf. Now you just convert it to uF or nF or whatever you want.

If the cap has two codes, that's just the number of pf-no multiplier. So a "47" would be 47pf.

Oh, and they'll often have a suffix letter too. That's the tolerance:
F=+/- 1%
G=+/- 2%
H=+/- 3%
J=+/- 5% (Most often you'll get 5% tolerance caps.)
K=+/- 10%
M=+/- 20%

As for what they do, they simply store up energy after being charged, almost like a little batter.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capacitor
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