#2
musictheory.net has an ear trainer that'll help you to identify intervals.
#4
Practice and practice. You should learn the theory behind intervals and practice figuring these out. A good website for this is http://www.good-ear.com/

After a while, you can develop the skill of hearing a chord progression and immediately know what those chords are. I learned that, so can you.
#5
and when you tune your guitar.. try and listen to the sounds and memorize them or when you are playing the major scale... try to sing the notes and say their names as you play them... im just starting to do because although i can tab out songs by ear i cant name the notes so you might wanna try it out..
#6
Ya you just have to practice. It all comes with time. Dont expect to be able to tab something out if youve only been playing a year. It takes a lot of time and effort. So just keep practicing.
Quote by funkdaddyfresh
justin, that was easily the most inspiring, helpful piece of advice anyone has ever given me in regards to my musical pursuits.


Screaming Help
#7
Quote by f0rs@k3n21
and when you tune your guitar.. try and listen to the sounds and memorize them or when you are playing the major scale... try to sing the notes and say their names as you play them... im just starting to do because although i can tab out songs by ear i cant name the notes so you might wanna try it out..

Being able to name a note without any point of reference is actually extremely rare, even among musicians, and what's known as perfect pitch. Much more common among musicians is relative pitch, which means if you play, say, a C note, tell them it's a C, and then play, say, an E, they'll be able to tell you it's an E. If you just play an E note with no poin of reference, however, hardly anyone will be able to identify it as an E.