#1
So I need to write a physics paper. Im a freshman in college. Anyway does anybody know how I could relate physics to a guitar. I was thinking along the lines of the way a string vibrates that causes different pitches.
If anybody has any ideas let me know
Cheers
#2
Guitar Physics have to do with the pickups of the guitar. Guitar pickups are magnetic pickups and how they work is that, when you hit the metal strings it vibrates inside the magnetic field created by the magnet, it interacts with it and converts that vibration into a tiny electric current identical to that vibration. This is picked up by the coil, which acts like an antenna, and then goes through the jack, the cable, to the guitar amp and that's how you hear that beautiful guitar sound. So this device "captures" the motion of the guitar strings. does that help any?
#3
You could use that, and how harmonics are just creating extra nodes, hence the reason you have to do artificial harmonics at different places to create the correct wavelength.

Edit: or is it anti-nodes?
#7
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#8
ye do that the string vibrates and the and produces standing waves then how it produces 1st 2nd 3rd harmonics. or u can do how the string vibrates and induces a current from the magnets in the pickups. There is also amplification.
Last edited by stone_sabbath at Feb 13, 2007,
#9
The guitar has very little to do with physics, why dont you think seriously what will get you a good mark. A college physics paper isnt perhaps the most important thing in the world, but you can write about something revolutionary, String Theory perhaps - the so called 'the theory of everything', or is that too hard?
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#10
Quote by _Tenacious_
The guitar has very little to do with physics, why dont you think seriously what will get you a good mark. A college physics paper isnt perhaps the most important thing in the world, but you can write about something revolutionary, String Theory perhaps, or is that too hard?


You'd better be kidding. A guitar, even moreso an electric guitar is built on many fundamental principles of physics. It doesn't have to be quantum physics to be college level.
Rig

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#12
The physics of an acoustic guitar are much more broad and interesting than the physics of a pickup.
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#13
Quote by x_themetalfan_x
You'd better be kidding. A guitar, even moreso an electric guitar is built on many fundamental principles of physics. It doesn't have to be quantum physics to be college level.


Im not kidding at all, who has ever gone on to achieve after writing an essay on the physics of guitars? If he were serious he'd put effort into learning something properly useful about physics. If string theory was too hard (i probably got carried away sorry) then something related to maths aswell.
Much of physics is about deriving and solving differential equations. The most important differential equation to learn, and the one most studied in undergraduate physics, is the harmonic oscillator equation, ax'' + bx' + cx = f(t), where x' means the time derivative of x(t).
If you possibly studied the mathematics of physics it would help you understand the more theortical part.
Algebra, Differential equations, single/multivariable calculus, Analytic Geometry, probablility, ect. Woot.
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I broke my toe as a result.
#14
you can also talk about the A440 tunings and all the frequencies of the strings
#15
Quote by magicninja_
I say go with tone. How the shape, density, and combinations of wood effect the sound of a guitar. I think that is where physics play the biggest role in guitars.


+1

Thats really interesting stuff when you get down to it.

Oh, and i think the pickups signal generation is electromagnetic induction... or it could just me magnetic induction... depends on active or passive pups i guess.
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#16
How about, if two notes play at the same time from the same place (e.g. Low E 5th fret harmonic and D string 14th fret note) the wavelengths "intersect" kind of thing and so you hear

Sound-quiet-sound-quiet.

Go try it.

The correct terms for it are somewhere about on the Internet.
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#17
all this stuff i did in my grade 11 physics class

i'm just saying
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#18
Quote by Killer_bacon
all this stuff i did in my grade 11 physics class

i'm just saying


Just what I was thinking. I don't know a whole lot about phisics, but sound waves, vibrations, frequencies and stuff seem a bit below a college level of phyics. But, I may be wrong.
#19
Maybe it's just a mandatory science course to get 3 hours so he can major in poetry or something.
#20
Ya, take about the formula F1L1=F1L2, where length is the length of the string you are picking, and _Tenacious_, guitars are built using fundamental physics, the frets aren't placed randomly, they need to be placed so that the length of the string will have the correct frequency, which makes the right "note".
#21
Yeah I'm a business student, just filling in a 3hr science credit. The class is called "How Things Work". Its a homework assignment, not a term paper or anything like that. Anyway thanks for all the ideas
#22
Relate it to when that member of Nirvana (I think it was, I'm not sure) threw up his guitar and it landed on his face.
I go to eleven..........