#1
Hello. Can someone give me some tips or tell me ways on combining the minor and major pentatonic scales when improvising? I use the minor pentatonic always and I know the major pentatonic, but I never use the major. I'm hoping someone can help me out here. If you could give links to sites or post diagrams of the two scales combined that would help me greatly.
Thank you.
"Notes are expensive. . .use them wisely"-B.B. King

"It's been very important throughout my career that I've met all the guys I've copied, because at each stage they've said, 'Don't play like me, play like you."-Eric Clapton
#2
they are both the same pattern... it depends what notes you put emphasis on and your perspective of the scale, take the first pattern say in A minor, well that same pattern can also be C major b/c A is the relative minor of C
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#3
They combine very simply. The minor pentatonic scale has 5 modes, and the 2nd of those modes is the major pentatonic scale. If you want to use the major more, see how the minor and major pentatonic scales connect directly to each other.
Member #3 of the "I play my guitar as high as Tom Morello does" club.
#4
Quote by Guns n' Zalen
they are both the same pattern... it depends what notes you put emphasis on and your perspective of the scale, take the first pattern say in A minor, well that same pattern can also be C major b/c A is the relative minor of C

exactly

actually, you have probably been playing the major pentatonic on several occasions, without even realising it
#5
I'm pretty sure he means using the A minor and A major pentatonics.

The way I do it in a blues progression is I play A major stuff over the A7 chord and then A minor stuff over the D7 chord.
#6
Thanks for the responses so far guys. Thanks bangoodcharlote, I'll have to try that. Keep the responses coming please. Every tip helps!
"Notes are expensive. . .use them wisely"-B.B. King

"It's been very important throughout my career that I've met all the guys I've copied, because at each stage they've said, 'Don't play like me, play like you."-Eric Clapton
Last edited by claptonfan55 at Feb 25, 2007,
#7
Anyone else have any ideas I can use for minor and major pentatonics?
"Notes are expensive. . .use them wisely"-B.B. King

"It's been very important throughout my career that I've met all the guys I've copied, because at each stage they've said, 'Don't play like me, play like you."-Eric Clapton
#9
Quote by sam i am
theres a great lesson on this site for combining all modes of the pentatonic....

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/guitar_techniques/hopscotch_method_part_1.html

there you go


Thanks a lot for your help, sam i am, I can probably use those scales to improve my soloing, too. Unfortunately, though, it doesn't include how to combine major and minor pentatonics. Its a great lesson, but its not what I'm looking for exactly. Anyone else have something that can help me?
"Notes are expensive. . .use them wisely"-B.B. King

"It's been very important throughout my career that I've met all the guys I've copied, because at each stage they've said, 'Don't play like me, play like you."-Eric Clapton
#10
ill try. first off, as im sure youve figured out, you can generally use the minor pent. over a major chord. so what im about to show you really isnt useful over a minor chord. anway jsut try to think of it like this:
minor pent.= 1, b3, 4, 5, b7, 1
major pent.= 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 1
combine them you get= 1, 2, b3, 3, 4, 5, 6, b7, 1
or in the key of A
A, B, C, C#, D, E, F#, G, A.
listen to eric clapton from the cream days alot, he combined them alot. alsp john mayer does it quite often. i hope this helps
#11
Try to find famous songs that combine the scales, then look at the underlying chords for clues as to when to use which scale. Two short examples:

Red House (Hendrix) intro: after the opening riff, Jimi plays minor pentatonic over the E (IV) chord, then switches to major pentatonic over the B (I). Stays in major penta over the F# (V) chord, then back very briefly to a minor sound over the E (IV) chord.

Rock and Roll (Zep) solo: most of solo is A minor penatonic, but after the D (IV) chord, switches briefly to A major penta over the A chord, then back to minor penta.

These point out what bangoodcharlote was saying, that in a I-IV-V type progression as in both of above, the major penta can sound good over the I and V chords, but doesn't sound as good over the IV chord.
#13
Quote by bangoodcharlote

The way I do it in a blues progression is I play A major stuff over the A7 chord and then A minor stuff over the D7 chord.


Yeah, that's pretty much right (although I think over the D7, A minor pent is actually
a subset of D Mixolydian).


Anyway, looking at minor vs major pent you might want to think of it like: in rock
improv you *tend* to use the minor pent to play *through* chord changes. Even
over a major chord the minor pent can be used (that's a blues thing). When it
comes to major pent, you use it more to *follow* the chord changes.

For instance, for a typical I, IV V blues in C: C7, F7 and G7. You could use C minor
pent through any of it and mix in C, F and G major pent over the right chord.
#14
Quote by guitarviz

These point out what bangoodcharlote was saying, that in a I-IV-V type progression as in both of above, the major penta can sound good over the I and V chords, but doesn't sound as good over the IV chord.


I assume you mean the I major pent over the IV chord. -- the IV major pent
over the IV sound great.
#15
Man, these last few responses have been awesome. I think that they're just what I'm looking for. Thanks edg and guitarviz. And special thanks to rixillis, b/c your idea seems to be perfect for what I want to do.
"Notes are expensive. . .use them wisely"-B.B. King

"It's been very important throughout my career that I've met all the guys I've copied, because at each stage they've said, 'Don't play like me, play like you."-Eric Clapton
#16
I used to be a minor pentaholic before I knew better. I tried to use it for everything
and then try to "guess" other outside notes. Really doesn't work too well.

Good practice is to just stop using it!

I found take a single progression -- the blues I, IV, V works great -- and practice
playing a few things over the chord changes. Those few things are: the major
pent of each chord, the arpeggio of each chord and the mixolydian of each. Don't
worry about what it sounds like, just get used to getting the shapes under your
fingers when the chord changes. Start in 1 position, and do all of them up the neck.
You'll see those 3 things are all related as well.

If you do enough of that, you'll find you can go back to the minor pent as before, but
now you'll be able to add LOTs of other notes and they won't be guesses either.
#17
your very welcome claptonfan.
and what others have said about avoiding the major pentatonic over the IV chord is definetaly something you dont want to forget, because third of the major pent clashes with the root of the IV chord very badly.