#1
Like the title says. It's an all solid wood guitar and the top (American spruce) is turning yellow. The back and sides ( African mahogany) and the fingerboard (Indian rosewood) have shown a little change but not nearly as much as the top. I think it looks pretty sweet but the question is... Is that normal or is it something I should be worried about?
#2
well sorry cant help you much there... my last one was really old when i got it and my new one is really new... but it might be the varnish, don't know why it's only on the top but maybe if you leave it lieing around or on a stand that's the bit that gets shined on by the sun the most??? i'm no expert, it mightn't be the varnish but if it is it shouldn't affect the guitar much
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#3
It's just the lacquer aging as far as I am aware. My '71 Yamaha is really orangy/yellow in colour now, but I like it.
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#4
^Yeah Lacquer turns yellow when exposed to UV light. Spruce does this too. Roswood turns to a more of a blackish brown, and mahogany changes to a chocolate brown. Some wood, like brazilian rosewood, will get lighter in color.
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#6
Ok well thanks for the info guys. I got one more question about aging.

From what I understand aging is caused by playing the guitar, but is that the only thing that causes it? If I were to leave my guitar untouched for two years and then pick it back up again would it still have gone through the aging process, or does it have to be played to age?
#7
Depends on what type of aging. I think for the wood maturing it has to be played in order for it to happen fast enough, but I'm not sure. You don't need to play the guitar for the wood and the lacquer to age from light though.
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#9
playing breaks down the material in the wood, causing it to age, and get a better tone, for solid top guitars. playing vibrates the wood, which causes aging. that is a general description. i'm just repeating what i can remember cord saying.
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