#1
Hi:

I want to record my notes, into my PC, I solo play with my electric guitar. Basically, as I play solo, I want to see the notes captured on my PC by a software (for example, Cubase LE), on the fly. Is this possible? These are the only 2 options I have been told:

1) a cheap Audio Interface unit (like Lexicon Omega USB Audio Interface), plus rediculously expensive Cubase 4 software ($800!).

2) Roland GR-20 Guitar Synthesizer with GK-3 Divided Pickup ($600).

Are these the only options? Is there any cheaper solution out there, other than those 2 options?

I really need this, so appreciate any help you can offer.

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BTW, I tried the configuration below, but it didn't work.

PC with Notation Composer <-->USB_to_Midi cable<-->Boss GT-8<-->Electric guitar

The GT-8 box has a midi in/out jack, of where the USB_to_midi cable is connected to.

I used Notation Composer 2.0, on my PC.

The configuration below worked, ie, the Notation Composer 2.0 captures the notes I played on my keyboard.

PC with Notation Composer <-->USB cable<-->Keyboard

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Peter
#2
Hi Peter, So you basically want to record your guitar to your pc heres how I do it, it took me a while to figure out as well

first I have my guitar and plug it into my behringer V AMP2 the using another instrument cable I connect the line out of the V AMp into the line in of my computer. The I open up Audacity and I set the project rate at the bottom to 4800 (the reason for this is because when you play to a metronome a 4100 setting makes you go out of sync while 4800 doesn't at least it works for me) Also set that little drop down box which should say microphone to line in and you'll be set.

If you can't hear your guitar but the sound is showing up when you record stuff, then go to the volume control in windows and un mute the line in or raise its volume some more. BTW to connect the instrument cable that goes from the V AMPs line out into the computer you need a 1/4" to 1/8" adapter which is easily found at radio shack.

then again this is my way of doing you could always get something like the line 6 tone port and record via that or buy this pedal

http://www.samsontech.com/products/productpage.cfm?prodID=1854&brandID=4

the Zoom G2.1U it has USB capabilities and all the effects you need to get a somewhat decent recording tone. I have no experience with it though. If this doesn't answer you question then sorry for making you read it hahaha excuse any typos and such
#3
Quote by fendabenda
Hi Peter, So you basically want to record your guitar to your pc heres how I do it, it took me a while to figure out as well

first I have my guitar and plug it into my behringer V AMP2 the using another instrument cable I connect the line out of the V AMp into the line in of my computer. The I open up Audacity and I set the project rate at the bottom to 4800 (the reason for this is because when you play to a metronome a 4100 setting makes you go out of sync while 4800 doesn't at least it works for me) Also set that little drop down box which should say microphone to line in and you'll be set.

If you can't hear your guitar but the sound is showing up when you record stuff, then go to the volume control in windows and un mute the line in or raise its volume some more. BTW to connect the instrument cable that goes from the V AMPs line out into the computer you need a 1/4" to 1/8" adapter which is easily found at radio shack.

then again this is my way of doing you could always get something like the line 6 tone port and record via that or buy this pedal

http://www.samsontech.com/products/productpage.cfm?prodID=1854&brandID=4

the Zoom G2.1U it has USB capabilities and all the effects you need to get a somewhat decent recording tone. I have no experience with it though. If this doesn't answer you question then sorry for making you read it hahaha excuse any typos and such


This is great information. Thanks a lot fendabenda! I will do investigation and will sure have more questions for you. Thx again.