#1
in the circuit (hopefully below) if speakers were connected across A and B, which would produce high frequencies and which would produce low frequncies? the values of capacitors and inductors aren't important at this stage, cos i can calculate that at a later date.
cheers,
andy.

edit: before anyone starts moaning about this beingin the wrong forum, im thinking of a crazy cab design that i might eventually build.
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Quote by Dave_Mc
how do those marshall handles compare tonewise to, say, mesa handles?

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Last edited by AndyPandy at Feb 15, 2007,
#2
I'm a bit tired but I'm pretty sure that B is the "bass" driver since the inductor and cap (the vertical ones) form a low passing filter, thus making A the higher frequency driver.


Just out of interest what sort of amp is this thing being used for? I've considered doing a couple of crossover type things with a couple of bass cabinets I've wired for folks, but never actually tried anything (due to lack of funds and time on the most part.)



EDIT: Thinking about it.. Are you sure you don't want a couple of resistors in there? You could get some "nicer" (ie more drastic tone changes) with a decent RLC filter or summit..
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#3
not entierly sure how i'm going to go about it jsut now, so the circuit ain't complete.

itwould be for a guitar amp. its more of an experiment to see if it works.
Quote by Dave_Mc
how do those marshall handles compare tonewise to, say, mesa handles?

Owns a Blackheart Little Giant...
#4
Cool idea. Power freak is right, it does form a low pass filter. I'm willing to bet B is the woofer too.
Don't really know much about these sorts of setups. Took apart a stereo once and there were some crossovers...sorry I can't help more.
I'm not very active here on UG currently.
I'm a retired Supermod off to the greener pastures of the real world.
#5
cheers, i looked up a physics book, and it suggests that b would be the woofer too.
Quote by Dave_Mc
how do those marshall handles compare tonewise to, say, mesa handles?

Owns a Blackheart Little Giant...
#6
At low frequencies, capacitors start looking like open circuits and inductors start to look like short circuits. So, on your circuit, at low frequencies, the A gets completely removed from the circuit, and B looks like it is connected directly to your signal.



At high frequencies, the opposite is true. Capactors begin to look like shorts, and inductors start looking like open circuits. In your circuit, this time B will have a short across it, and produce no sound, and A will get all the signal.




That's the basics, so if that's all you want to know, stop there. If you want to know a little more about it keep reading. The impedance of a capacitor is defined as 1/(jwC), where w is your frequency in radians (for hertz it'd be 1/(j*2*pi*C)). So, as you can tell, as your frequency gets larger, your impedance gets smaller, hence it appears to be a short circuit. The impedance of an inductor is jwL. At higher frequencies, the impedance gets larger and larger, and it starts to look more like an open circuit. Hope this helps.

EDIT: These kinds of setups are common in things like home stereo systems that have a woofer, tweeter, and midrange all in one cabinet.
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Last edited by ljplum12 at Feb 16, 2007,
#7
that helps a lot thanks. not sure if i'm gonna have the money to build anything soon, but i'll post if i do anything with this
Quote by Dave_Mc
how do those marshall handles compare tonewise to, say, mesa handles?

Owns a Blackheart Little Giant...