#1
I am looking for a good book with as many differnt chord types (dominant 7, 9th ect )which has an easy learning system, for example the CAGED system, with diagrams and forms.Thanks in advance.
Last edited by sully111 at Feb 16, 2007,
#2
"Chord Chemistry" and "Modern Chord Progressions" by Ted Greene are both extremely good books that teach the different chord shapes through common progressons. ( i have no idea what the CAGED system is)
#3
Woah, hold your horses...
Ahem, learn the caged system if you like, but i would not recomend it.
The caged system is 5 different scale shapes, however a major scale has 7 notes...which means that 2 of thoses notes as roots are left out, instead your should learn your 7 scale shapes, each one starting with a different root, but for chord books i don't know, i usually figure out my chords on my own, but i guess you coud check out the books fenderfrk10 suggested

Edit: Also learn your scales by what notes are in it, and learn to play them linearly, that will help you move around them alot easier, and not confine yourself to a shape, and you'll know the scale better.
Last edited by khalil1220 at Feb 16, 2007,
#4
fenderfrk10 thank you very much for telling me about chord chemistry, but i have a question what chords other than dominant 7th chords and poly chords does , chord chemistry deal with?
#5
Chord Chemistry contains just about every type of chord in ternary harmony, and some that aren't. That's only part of the payoff, though, since it also shows you how they can be used. After the chord dictionary, there are chapters on Chord Substitutions, Voice Leading, Chord Melodies, and progressions in blues and rock music.

Modern Chord Progressions is something to look into once you feel like you've taken a lot of Chord Chemistry in. There are just countless examples of progressions that can be used in jazz and classical music.

After Ted Greene died, some of his former students actually put together a website that contains some of the lessons that he gave. And there are also forums there with some very knowledgeable people that can explain some things to you. The website is just www.tedgreene.com
#6
Fretboard logic.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#7
Quote by titopuente
Chord Chemistry contains just about every type of chord in ternary harmony, and some that aren't. That's only part of the payoff, though, since it also shows you how they can be used. After the chord dictionary, there are chapters on Chord Substitutions, Voice Leading, Chord Melodies, and progressions in blues and rock music.

Modern Chord Progressions is something to look into once you feel like you've taken a lot of Chord Chemistry in. There are just countless examples of progressions that can be used in jazz and classical music.

After Ted Greene died, some of his former students actually put together a website that contains some of the lessons that he gave. And there are also forums there with some very knowledgeable people that can explain some things to you. The website is just www.tedgreene.com



thanks for tellin him that for me. since it finally got cold enough where I live for all the lakes to freeze over, I was out playing hockey 'til probably 11 est