#1
i have always been confused by the chromatic scale
the wikipedia article doesn't make it any clearer, it just confuses me heaps

if it's all 12 notes that are used in western music, doesn't that mean there shouldn't be any theory attached? how can they have a harmonic AND melodic chromatic scale if they both use the same notes?

why does it say that while playing in the chromatic scale you can borrow chords from other modes? all the notes are in the scale, so shouldn't you be able to play any notes anyway, without that meaning that you're "borrowing them from other scales"

this is confusing the **** out of me. if anyone can clear it all up that would be great

cheers
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#2
I think it means every note is in scale. It's when you play a lick, then move it up or down one fret at a time, playing it on each fret. You would eventually hit every note.

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#3
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i have always been confused by the chromatic scale
the wikipedia article doesn't make it any clearer, it just confuses me heaps

if it's all 12 notes that are used in western music, doesn't that mean there shouldn't be any theory attached? how can they have a harmonic AND melodic chromatic scale if they both use the same notes?

why does it say that while playing in the chromatic scale you can borrow chords from other modes? all the notes are in the scale, so shouldn't you be able to play any notes anyway, without that meaning that you're "borrowing them from other scales"

this is confusing the **** out of me. if anyone can clear it all up that would be great

cheers
chromatic is based off a half step
SO this is how it goes theirs chromatic and diodic steps
diodic steps skips whole step and a chromatic skips a half step
Last edited by deemoe4tweezy at Feb 17, 2007,
#4
On the contrary, there should be even more theory with the chromatic scale, since anything you play you would have to know how to use intervals; it's the same as knowing when to use accidentals.

So basically... with the chromatic scale, there is no "out of key" notes, to put it simply. However, like I said above; theory above all else is most important, otherwise how would you know what you're playing and to keep it coherent without sounding awful?
#6
i know that it has all 12 notes, but on the wikipedia article it says that there's 2 chromatic scales: the melodic and harmonic.

and it also said that with the scale you can borrow chords from other scales. but if it has all 12 notes in it, then no matter what chord you play it's in scale, so it isn't borrowing at all.

yeah, it's just that those bits really confused me.

by the way, i wasn't saying there shouldn't be more theory, i was just saying i don't get why these things ^^ are important, since they seem contradictory.
Quote by B4Dkarma
When you look at a guy and immediately go, "wow, what a douchebag"

that is what girls find attractive.
#7
That article is pretty confusing... the way I understand it is...

The harmonic chromatic scale has the degrees 1, b2, 2, b3, 3, 4, #4, 5, b6, 6, b7, 7, and never deviates from that. So if it was in the key of C, the notes would always be C, Db, D, Eb, E, F, F#, G, Ab, A, Bb, B. You would always write Db, and never C#. That's my understanding.

And the melodic chromatic scale? It can be anything, but is dependent on it's key signature. So if you played the melodic chromatic scale in C# major, you might notate it C#, D, D#, E natural, E#, F#, F##, G#, A natural, A#, B natural, B#.

So:
Harmonic chromatic = set way of notating it
Melodic chromatic = way of notating it depending on key signature, and whether it goes up or down


I think that's what it's trying to say!