#1
So, a while back I bought an Epiphone Dot Studio. http://www.epiphone.com/default.asp?ProductID=228&CollectionID=1
It cost be about $390. About half a year ago it broke. It was standing up inside its hardshell case, and it fell over, causing the head to crack off about an inch above the nut. I can take some pictures if necessary.

It's just been sitting in my room ever since, and I think it's about time to figure out what I'm gonna do with it. The dude at my local Long & McQuade said it would cost me about $500 to get the neck put back on professionally ( I could just buy another one at that price.)

I toyed with the idea of getting some Stienberger replacement parts and converting it headless. I don't even know if this is possible; I don't know anything at all about modding guitars. I also looked at the possibility of replacing the whole neck. I know it's got a maple set neck. Again, I have no idea how I would go about doing this.

If anybody has any suggestions or ideas, I'd really appreciate it. Thanks!
#2
Take pictures.
Will says:
DON'T FEAR THE REAPER!
- SmarterChild - says:
I don't know if I can help it.

Member #6 of the "I play my guitar as high as Tom Morello does" club
#3
I suggest you post some pictures so that the guys here can provide useful information!
#4
If you were to go headless, you'd need a bridge with fine tuners to tune your guitar. Are you not able to buy/make a headstock, and put it on? You'd be best to measure the current one if you were to do this. I'm lost for ideas apart from that though. And I'm unsure if it's possible.

Pics please.
#5
You could probably fix it yourself rather than butchering it into some Steinberger man-child thing.
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#10
If it's a clean break and there are no chips of wood missing, that can be repaired. You'll just need to glue it back together, making sure the glue gets to all parts of the joint, clamp it up and leave it for a while (a good week or so given the tension thatll be on it) and it should be fine. It is repairable yes, and I'd probably do that myself than have to pay someone 500 freakin dollars for someone else to do it.
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#11
You're lucky, that's a very clean, straight break. Just follow the diagram. Make sure you remove the tuners, nut and truss rod cover so you don't get that stuff all full of glue.
Will says:
DON'T FEAR THE REAPER!
- SmarterChild - says:
I don't know if I can help it.

Member #6 of the "I play my guitar as high as Tom Morello does" club
#12
Alright, thanks for the info guys. The guy at L&M said I could do that, but I'd have to keep it tuned down to help alleviate the string pressure, though. Is that true?

Also, if I decide to totally replace the neck, do you have any suggestions? I know having the set neck complicates things, but is it still possible?
#13
Music store guys are pussies. Glued joints are stronger than the wood itself. If it breaks, just clean the old glue off and re-glue it. That seems to be an issue with Gibson and Epiphone necks. You'll be able to tune it to standard if you don't abuse it, and let the glue set for a good while.
Will says:
DON'T FEAR THE REAPER!
- SmarterChild - says:
I don't know if I can help it.

Member #6 of the "I play my guitar as high as Tom Morello does" club
#14
I just bought one of these, and the neck shouldnt be THAT hard to get out of the body and replace. You get access to the neck tendon (or whatever) under the neck pickup. Im guessing its glued with hide glue, so you'll probably need to heat it up, but it looks possible.
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#15
I guess you could try glue make sure it's super strong stuff though, it has to hold the tension of the strings. If that doesn't work, find a neck that will last, and ask around for one that won't do that happened to the one on the guitar that you have right now.
#17
Glue will be more than strong enough, as long as you leave it to set for long enough. The angled headstock would only have been glued on in the first place. (please correct me if I'm wrong)
#18
Okay, I'm just thinking out loud here but what if you drilled wooden dowels into it for extra support (like on either side of the truss rod) I think that might make it strong enough.

Dont forget the woodfiller whatever method you take, otherwise youre gonna see the cracks.
#19
The truss rod doesn't go to the part that broke.

To reinforce it, you could put some nails through the break from the back. Not deep enough to come through the other side, but deep enough to hold it in.
Will says:
DON'T FEAR THE REAPER!
- SmarterChild - says:
I don't know if I can help it.

Member #6 of the "I play my guitar as high as Tom Morello does" club
#20
I know, I'm just trying to specify where I'm talking about. Going the direction the truss rod goes put some dowels where the break is.
#22
Try some gorilla glue, that stuff is REALLY strong. Make sure you know wht you're doing first, otherwise you'll never be able to fix it.
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