#1
I'll make this short.

So I've been playing for about a year now, and I only know a handful of songs. However, I have almost 2 full-scaps (both sides) of riffs and melodies that I made up myself.

My question is: would it be a good idea to learn more songs, and why?
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#3
Well, in my experience, I tend to get bored playing the same old songs.
Creating your own riffs is good, can lead to your own song.

It's always a good idea to learn more, otherwise, why bother playing?
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#5
You should never stop learning, whether it be songs, scales or just simple melodies, it all helps you out in the long run.
#6
Yeah it would.

You can take a lot of inspiration from the writing of others, so it will make your writing better. If you've been learning for a year, you've probably pretty much nailed all the basic theory you'd get from it, but learning other people's songs is how I first learnt chords, and it exposes you to many things. If you pick up on things in songs as a beginner it teaches you things.

Another reason is that you'd obviously be able to play all your stuff, but so what? If you push yourself to learn something which looks really hard in comparison to what you normally play, you will become a better, more adept guitarist. It's called a challenge.
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#7
Yes, obviously. Try to learn music from different genres, so as to broaden your sense of music.
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#8
You definitely should learn as much as you can. It makes you feel more instictive about chord changes.

I was writing a riff just yesterday and it wasn't until several hours later that I realised one of the chord changes was very similar to something used by Radiohead. It can subliminaly influence you into knowing what will sound good
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#9
Quote by Kurapica

I was writing a riff just yesterday and it wasn't until several hours later that I realised one of the chord changes was very similar to something used by Radiohead. It can subliminaly influence you into knowing what will sound good


Actually, this is what I was afraid of. I thought that if I learn too many songs, whenever I try to come up with any of my own, it'll just sound like someone elses. Maybe I'm just paranoid about originality...

Thanks for your help guys.
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#10
Quote by Skar
Actually, this is what I was afraid of. I thought that if I learn too many songs, whenever I try to come up with any of my own, it'll just sound like someone elses. Maybe I'm just paranoid about originality...

Thanks for your help guys.


Well, it's good to have a wide range so you know if you're falling into someone elses riff.

Don't be worried about what I said, it was just one chord change of mine (out of 9, would you believe) was similar, not the same, as one chord change in a Radiohead song out of about 4.
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