#1
I have a fender showmaster and i was wondering how i can get it to stay in tune when using the whammy.the tremolo is designed just like that on the stratocaster and i need to do whatever i can to get it to stay perfectly in tune while playing without having to buy another guitar.Can someone please help me?
#2
locking tuners?
Locking Nut?


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#3
i agree. get some gotohs or grovers and install a floyd locking nut. idk how much tho
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#4
Locking nuts on guitars without fine tuners are bad. They mess up your tuning, the very thing you want to prevent.
Will says:
DON'T FEAR THE REAPER!
- SmarterChild - says:
I don't know if I can help it.

Member #6 of the "I play my guitar as high as Tom Morello does" club
#6
^ I agree, and a locking nut is a bad idea unless you have a Floyd Rose-style trem.
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#7
Quote by Lordoflax
locking tuners?
Locking Nut?


Locking nut is a stupid idea on a strat without fine tuners as closing the locking nut raises the pitch, and you will not be able to change this without undo'ing the locking nut.....

A strat trem is never suposed to be used like a floyd...... You can do several things to make it more stable.....

>Tighten the screws on the front plate of the trem, below the strings
>Change your nut to a roller or graphite nut
>Change your saddles to graphite saddles
>Change to locking tuners
>Add more springs to the claw
>Lubricate nut with graphite
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#8
I'm also assuming that's a two point tremolo...I haven't ever used one...But if it isn't...
Here's another tip: buy some graphite lubricant, I use Guitar Grease, you can get it from stewmac.com. Rub some where the 6 mounting screws 'pivot' on the body. This will help it return to pitch easier. Also, rub some on the udnerside of the string trees on the headstock. This will help the strings pass through easier.
#9
Quote by forsaknazrael
I'm also assuming that's a two point tremolo...I haven't ever used one...But if it isn't...
Here's another tip: buy some graphite lubricant, I use Guitar Grease, you can get it from stewmac.com. Rub some where the 6 mounting screws 'pivot' on the body. This will help it return to pitch easier. Also, rub some on the udnerside of the string trees on the headstock. This will help the strings pass through easier.



Why not save money and use pencil lead????
Frank Zappa's not dead. He just smells funny.
#10
If you use good quality pencils then there's no harm, I assume.
Will says:
DON'T FEAR THE REAPER!
- SmarterChild - says:
I don't know if I can help it.

Member #6 of the "I play my guitar as high as Tom Morello does" club
#12
As long as you use pencils with graphite then it will be fine... lol

I don't know, my Strat stays in tune good and it's got locking tuners...
#13
Quote by kelvinxkelvin
i agree. get some gotohs or grovers and install a floyd locking nut. idk how much tho


Umm, what's the point in locking tuners AND a locking nut? Doesn't one defeat the purpose of the other?
Get a graphite nut, some locking tuners and get your bridge set up properly by a reputable tech. It should help you a lot with tuning issues
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#15
Now although it is highly unpractical I'd like to point out that the saddles could act as fine tuners. It would be a pain and probibly mess up the intonation.


I recomment locking tuners, graphite nut, rolling or graphtech saddles(although rubbing graphite from a pencil in the nut and saddles works too.), and nut sauce...just cuz its fun to say...
#16
As far as I can tell, all the showmaster guitars use a 2 pivot-point bridge. This should help with the tuning stability. You will want to upgrade to locking tuners, but with a proper setup and string wrapping practices, you can get away without using them. Lubrication at the nut, pivot posts, saddles and all other string breaking points helps as well. Graphite from pencil lead works well (look for the softest lead possible, you can look up the hardness ratings on the internet) but you can also use chapstick. Also, the string trees are a problem area. First, you can get rid of the string tree for the G and D strings, they're not needed. Get some washers and raise the B/E string tree up so that the break angle matches the rest of the strings.

The best gains can be had by understanding the tension balance of the bridge. The treble strings have the highest tension, therefore they need the least spring pull. The bass strings have the lowest tension, therefore they need more spring pull. This will balance the bridge so the entire unit pivots as one. If the bridge is unbalanced, the bridge can warp slightly when using the trem, and the entire unit will pivot at different tolerances and pressures.

I use a vintage style 6 pivot point bridge and set it up to float (like every good Strat bridge should). After understanding how the whole things works, I have not had any tuning issues, and I tend to go wild on the whammy.
#18
Quote by TwoString
As far as I can tell, all the showmaster guitars use a 2 pivot-point bridge. This should help with the tuning stability. You will want to upgrade to locking tuners, but with a proper setup and string wrapping practices, you can get away without using them. Lubrication at the nut, pivot posts, saddles and all other string breaking points helps as well. Graphite from pencil lead works well (look for the softest lead possible, you can look up the hardness ratings on the internet) but you can also use chapstick. Also, the string trees are a problem area. First, you can get rid of the string tree for the G and D strings, they're not needed. Get some washers and raise the B/E string tree up so that the break angle matches the rest of the strings.

The best gains can be had by understanding the tension balance of the bridge. The treble strings have the highest tension, therefore they need the least spring pull. The bass strings have the lowest tension, therefore they need more spring pull. This will balance the bridge so the entire unit pivots as one. If the bridge is unbalanced, the bridge can warp slightly when using the trem, and the entire unit will pivot at different tolerances and pressures.

I use a vintage style 6 pivot point bridge and set it up to float (like every good Strat bridge should). After understanding how the whole things works, I have not had any tuning issues, and I tend to go wild on the whammy.


I've been "lucky" so far since I haven't had any issues with tuning stability, even with my more inexpensive or stock tuners. However, what you posted is very interesting. What did you mean by the 6 point (vintage style) being set up to float? As a starting point, I have 4 or 5 springs on all my Strat-style guitars. Thanks.

#19
I use 3 springs. You set the springs like so:
claw
 /|\
block


So that the tension is dvided evenly. The way I do it, is I tune the strings to pitch, then loosen/tighten my bridge until I get can get about a 1/2 step on pulling up, and a good divebomb going on. That's how I do it, anyway.

EDIT: Also, the screws should be set so that the middle 4 are a bit looser than the outer two, to help it return to pitch better.
#20
I have stock tuners and stock nut on my strat, my trem set with 2 springs, it is the stock MIM trem and never goes out of tune... its weird.... sorry to hijack but how do i set it up to be able to go 1/2 step up????


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#21
I'd recommend you get 3 springs. Better stability. Then set it up like my crappy text diagram.
When you tune it to pitch, if the springs are set loose enough, your bridge should be floating a bit over your body. From there, just judge how much pulling back on it raises the pitch, and adjust the claw accordingly. You can get a full step up, but it makes the divebomb pretty weak. So I keep it at 1/2 step.

EDIT: Here's a guide - http://members.tripod.com/~AFH/Tips.html
Last edited by forsaknazrael at Mar 3, 2007,
#22
I had 3 springs on it for about a year, but removed one and it NEVER goes out of tune... wich screws are the ones I have to fix the ones on the claw????


Quote by robbo_0013
UniverseZero is some kind of pwnerer of numerals

Quote by spazzymagee417
your avatar entertains me.
#24
Quote by forsaknazrael
I use 3 springs. You set the springs like so:
claw
/|\
block


So that the tension is dvided evenly. The way I do it, is I tune the strings to pitch, then loosen/tighten my bridge until I get can get about a 1/2 step on pulling up, and a good divebomb going on. That's how I do it, anyway.

EDIT: Also, the screws should be set so that the middle 4 are a bit looser than the outer two, to help it return to pitch better.


6 screws? The threadstarter has a two point tremolo.
Will says:
DON'T FEAR THE REAPER!
- SmarterChild - says:
I don't know if I can help it.

Member #6 of the "I play my guitar as high as Tom Morello does" club
#26
my claw is set up like that .....with 3 springs.so yes or no locking tuners? I would just like to avoid spending $200 upgrading when all i need is a quick $2 fix.now what?
#27
Roller Nut!
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#29
dont install a floyd cause that just kills the gutiar....what eddy van halen did before the floyd rose was first popularized he greased up the nut and i guess it worked cause he kept doin it until a floyd...so w/e u do dont get a floyd on it because u have to cut ur headstock off then glue a piece of wood on then take a chunk out of the body on ur gutiar an thats guna cost u liek 400 bucks so dont do it
#32
i see my options as 1)roller or graphite nut 2)greasing the nut to get that van halen type thing going on 3)The locking tuners. see i would hate to buy the most expensive being the locking tuners when i might just need some guitar grease at the nut.But i have no one to talk to this about because the guys at my local music store are dicks and they say the only other solution is buying a whole new guitar.so i am stuck at a crossroads.
#33
ok jsut so you know the showmaster already has a graphite nut and locking tuners, a thing that happens with a lot of fenders is the g string goes out of tune when usign the wammy or when your bending, if it went out of tune while bending hit the whammy itl go back and vice versa if it went out of tune w the tremelo bend it, itl go back, also how long have you had it, a newer trem sometimes goes out of tune more
#34
get a graphite nut, its 5 bucks off stewmac, its better than greasing your nut... try it out for a while if you still have problems get the tuners.


Quote by robbo_0013
UniverseZero is some kind of pwnerer of numerals

Quote by spazzymagee417
your avatar entertains me.
#36
I'm surprised nobody here has mentioned the Hipshot Tremsetter. It works like a charm to return the trem on a Strat to the neutral position.
#37
Quote by Volta!
ok jsut so you know the showmaster already has a graphite nut and locking tuners, a thing that happens with a lot of fenders is the g string goes out of tune when usign the wammy or when your bending, if it went out of tune while bending hit the whammy itl go back and vice versa if it went out of tune w the tremelo bend it, itl go back, also how long have you had it, a newer trem sometimes goes out of tune more

Apply some Big Bends Nut Sauce underneath the string trees. That should help it a lot. Also apply it to the nut slots and maybe even the bridge saddles.