#1
I keep hearing about it and I still don't understand it.. I took a look at the lessons/columns on UG about it and it still didn't really help me...

what was is that CAGED method thing???
Note: Sorry if my grammar and/or vocabulary isn't very good, English is my 2nd language!

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#3
that's all??? huh.. I thought that it was more than that and that it was really important to learn... everybody knows C A G E D chords are open and they're so easy to remember....


anyways, thanks!
Note: Sorry if my grammar and/or vocabulary isn't very good, English is my 2nd language!

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#4
no, its where you use the caged shapes so you use the open shapes at frets 3 5 8 and 10
so a c on the third fret would be an a shape but with a barre across the third and the same working throught all the chords you just follow the caged letters which ever is next so for d would be c.
#5
Quote by sully111
no, its where you use the caged shapes so you use the open shapes at frets 3 5 8 and 10
so a c on the third fret would be an a shape but with a barre across the third and the same working throught all the chords you just follow the caged letters which ever is next so for d would be c.
Yeah, you can play them as barre chords, but the G-shape barre is very tough and the only common barre shapes are A and E.
#6
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Yeah, you can play them as barre chords, but the G-shape barre is very tough and the only common barre shapes are A and E.


most common for majors at least. Am and Em are used all the time as well
#8
By using the CAGED system you catalogue all your information like scales, chords, arpeggio's etc into different positions on the neck. By using the system, it gives you 5 places to play everything, as apposed to just the one standard place.
#9
CAGED is the easiet way to remember major or minor scales shapes, every open chord shape has a relative major scale shape and every major scale has its a relative minor scale.
So the only thing to do memorize the relations between open chords and major scales, then identify the open chords (just CAGED shapes in any key) at the fretboard and you will know the shape of every major or minor scale in the whole fretboard

Note: My apologizes for my english, I am brazilian
#10
Well people are telling me "overall information" but does anyone know where I can find a very in-deep explanation because I have NO IDEA how it works... It looks very good tho
Note: Sorry if my grammar and/or vocabulary isn't very good, English is my 2nd language!

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you show me yours and I'll show you mine!


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#11
It works like this: imagine the open C chord in its real place(fret one, two and three), now try to find the C major scale located at the same place of the C major chord from the first to the sixth string. If you move the open C major chord to the fifth fret you will have a D major chord (using a barre or not, doesn't mind) and the shape of the scale remains the same but in the D key, do it to all the fretboard and you find out all scales with the open C major shape.

Then do the same thing with the shape of the open A chord, Open G chord, open E chord and open D chord (CAGED) and you find out all the shapes a major scale have at the fretboard. That' easy, try to fit the chord into the shape of the scale as an arpeggio, it's a good exercise.

To find the relative minor scale, just begin at the sixth degree of the major scale in question, for example: the relative minor scale of C major is A minor.

I really hope you understand me. That's the CAGED method.
Last edited by guitarcello at Mar 23, 2007,
#12
Its an underlying map you can use. Anything you play - chords, scales, riffs, whatever - can all be related back to the underlying CAGED pattern.

For example: here's a real common blues/rock lick:


--------
-7--5---
-7--5h6-
--------
--------
--------


now, you could knock yourself out trying to analyze what scale are those notes from, or is it in the hexopukolydian mode with a sharped 18th or whatever.

or you could just say to yourself, I know that I'm in the key of A. What is the easiest way for me to remember this cool riff so that I can transpose it around to any other key I happen to be playing in?

Well, where is the closest A chord? Its the E shape (a.k.a. sixth string root), at the fifth fret.

-5-
-5-
-6-
-7-
-7-
-5-

So you make a mental note of how that riff is related to the underlying chord. What are the visual intervals. However you want to do it, whatever works for you. For example, you might think, oh that note on the third string that's being hammer-on to is in the same place as the note on the third string of that sixth string root "E" shaped chord.

So you wake up tomorrow and have a sudden urge to finish this song you wrote in C#, how can you use that same riff in C#? 1) determine where to play an "E" shape C# chord. That would be at the ninth fret of course:

-9-
-9-
-10-
-11-
-11-
-9-

So using that underlying shape as the foundation, you place the riff:


---------
-11--9---
-11--9h10-
---------
---------
---------


The above is a fairly simple example. Where it gets more interesting is analyzing shapes to underlying "G" or "D" or "C" shape (think Hendrix) , rather then to underlying "E" or "A" shapes which most guitar players know.

If things don't work mapping to the CAGED shape of the key, try doing it to the CAGED shape of the underlying chord. Lots of times riffs and fills are built more off the chord then the key.

There are very few times you'll actually be playing a fully barred G, or C or D chord. But just knowing where those notes are can be really helpful. That's the thing about CAGED: its an underlying visual map, not neccesarily chords you play.

Check out Fretboard Logic, a classic, its all about CAGED. Or Fretboard Theory, a relatively recent book:
http://www.guitar-music-theory.com/

Do a google search to see what the basic CAGED map looks like. Its pretty simple. If you know how to do sixth string root (E shape) and fifth string root (A shape) barre chords you're two fifths of the way there. Then you just have to know how to move it around the neck to fit the underlying key (or chord).
#14
p.s. I got that image from some site, I forget where... hope it wasn't yours

I'll try and find the link to that site because that's one of the better CAGED maps I've seen, others show it as separate diagrams and you don't get a sense of how they're all part of one big pattern.

(note: the diagram wraps around back to "C" following the "D" shape, just keeps going up neck.)
#15
Quote by hurlyz
Well people are telling me "overall information" but does anyone know where I can find a very in-deep explanation because I have NO IDEA how it works... It looks very good tho


I recommend the Fretboard Logic series of books if you want to know more about it.
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