#1
Is one really more important then the other? I mean I hear people say that practicing scales for hours a day is the most important thing you can do; but at the same time you see some of the most accomplished and respected guitarists (Dimebag, Hendrix, SRV etc) and they hardly practiced scales at all and spent most of their time just playing and jamming. So is there really one correct way to practice? Or does it really depend on the person?
#2
well. Try alternating. jam for a few hours, then study scales. I usually just jam but when i run out of motivation and set my guitar down i practice memorizing scale shapes and modes.
#3
Quote by Spamwise
but at the same time you see some of the most accomplished and respected guitarists (Dimebag, Hendrix, SRV etc) and they hardly practiced scales at all and spent most of their time just playing and jamming.
If they say that, they're lying. They practiced their asses off, I assure you.
#5
i say practice your scales WHILE jamming.

helps you play 'em in different keys and modes, and in time and at different tempos.
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#6
Quote by bangoodcharlote
If they say that, they're lying. They practiced their asses off, I assure you.

I'm not saying they didn't practice a lot, but they've all said they knew little or no theory (dimebag said he only knew like 4 scales including chromatic).

^True! Jamming in a way is practicing scales, as i think you can gain a lot more from using how to learn them then just ascending and descending.
#7
well actually now that i think of it everything you play on a guitar is based on a scale!!!!!!! lol
#8
Quote by SillyRabbit
well actually now that i think of it everything you play on a guitar is based on a scale!!!!!!! lol

Yeah, I'm talking more about spending four hours going up and down scales with a metronome.
#9
Quote by Spamwise
Yeah, I'm talking more about spending four hours going up and down scales with a metronome.


There are some musicians who can just do it. They can play in time, they can play what they hear in their head, and they learn technique very fast. But then there are people like me who need a more disciplined practice routine.

And i guarantee you this, the guitarist of the future are going to most likely be the people who practice like this(maybe not four hours a day to a metronome). But i mean this in the context of people who are going to pursue music as a career. And anytime you pursue something as a career you should spend countless hours doing and learning your job.

Should you spend four hours(again i don't really mean four hours a day) doing scales to a metronome? Depends on where you are going with your music.

Should you spend a little bit of time doing scales to a metronome? Sure, its great for coordination, accuracy and speed.
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