#1
Starting to learn how to improvise, teacher at the momment gave me a g major scale to improvise on the whole neck, but i heard people say i should start on the pentatonic scale because its easier or something...and i'm having abit of trouble coming up with good licks and such, should i satart improvising on Pentatonic or continue with the G major? and some tips on improvising..thanks =)=)
#2
Gmaj. Soooo many people get stuck doing the same thing over and over on the pentatonic scale.
#3
Go find a backing track in G major (try freelicks.com) and just keep that scale in mind. Sure the pentatonic is easier, but that's only cause it has less notes:P(penta=5.. major scale has 7). Throw some bends, hammerons, pulloffs, and what not in that scale. Just skip around and have fun. Improvising doesn't have a formula.. you just gotta play what you feel.
#4
get on the minor/major pentatonic 1st, they're the most basic. Eventually when you're better, move on to the basic major and minor scale. When you're advanced, get into modes and explore the whole fretboard. And listen to a lot of instumentals/solos.
"Play with your ears" - Yngwie Malmsteen, Paul Gilbert
Thats what she said...
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#6
Dream Theatre are usually a really good example.
But they are pretty boring if you don't like em or whatever.

Have fun!
#7
I believe that first you should learn the first mode, the Ionian mode (the major scale) then the Dorian then Phrygian etc... It really helps to know the modes because it helps you play over any chords you need to play over

But for a head start, you may want to learn the minor pentatonic (1, minor third, flat fifth) and the major pentatonic (1, major third and flat fifth i think. forgot, and my theory escapes me :p)
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#8
I'd say learn the major scale first - umtimately everything you learn, whether it's chords, scales or modes, uses the major scale as it's point of reference. The pentatonic is a simplified version of either the major or minor scale, depending on which one you use so you should really learn the major scale first so you understand where it comes from.
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#9
ok what i suggest is that you use whatever scale you want. what you should really focus on is going over some patterns and exploring how to change them to fit the scale. for instance try the C pentatonic beginning on the 12 fret of the high E. start from the bottom. play the first 5 notes (ascending) then go to the second note that will be the e (octave), play the next 5 notes and so on. this is a pattern that uses 5 notes and can add an exotic feel to the licks you put together. also practice other peoples patterns that they use a lot and make them fit into the scale you are using. sweeping through the scale can be fun and sound good, for instance when using a pentatonic take the barre chord shape and sweep it, begin very slowly. also using lagato over the scale is useful. or simply try moving up and down a few notes, and add a few string skips and lo and behold you have a basic solo. something that is also useful when you get to it will be modulation and the selection of scales that you use, and the reasoning behind them. we can start here, have a Cmajor scale, derive the relative minor (ask ur teacher) Am, then the harmonic minor will also work well, this is just a general working of scales. so the scales you can modulate from a C will be a Am and a Am harmonic. good luck. just take it slow, and sometimes it doesnt matter if its theoretically correct, dissonance is great too.
#10
^ no one's gonna read that....srsly...
"Play with your ears" - Yngwie Malmsteen, Paul Gilbert
Thats what she said...
UGmusic
#11
Do note that by learning the major scale, you are also learning the pentatonic (technically you're learning all of the associated modes as well, but that's another story). Knowing how to use the major scale will allow you all the room the pentatonic gives you and then some.
#12
Quote by HaikuAndGuitar
Go find a backing track in G major (try freelicks.com) and just keep that scale in mind. Sure the pentatonic is easier, but that's only cause it has less notes:P(penta=5.. major scale has 7). Throw some bends, hammerons, pulloffs, and what not in that scale. Just skip around and have fun. Improvising doesn't have a formula.. you just gotta play what you feel.



You bastard, I put freelicks.com in my adress bar and guess what came up!? A ****ING PORNO SITE! YOU FREELICKER!
#14
Oops sorry man. I've had that problem too. I have it bookmarked now. Honest mistake. Sorry about that.
#15
If you know the major scale you can hear how a pentatonic scale is taken from it. I would stick with learning what you are learning.
#16
Quote by Guitarmike123
^ It's www.freelicks.net
I've ended up on that site myself a few times when typing wrong.


Aha, I have actually.

I found that after learning a few solos and scales the improv just poured out.
#17
Your teacher wants you to cover the whole neck?

G major scale?

Well, I'd start by finding all the Gs on the neck, then the chord tones (G B D), then the pentatonics (G A B D E), then the scales (G A B C D E F#)

Wanna make it easier? Look up the CAGED system and learn how to use the 5 chord shapes (C A G E D), then learn how they're linked.
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