#1
i've decided to a list of what I want to accomplish each week, and i've decided to start with memorizing scales in the key of A. So far I have the following scales written down: Major, Minor, Major Pent., Minor Pent., Harmonic Minor, and Melodic Minor. Anything else I should include? I'm not going to work on modes yet, and I'm not going to include things like the blues scale as that is only minor pent with an added degree.
#3
Quote by mattvl
I'm guessing you memorized the fretboard already?

To some degree, I'm not like my teacher who could pick a fret and instantly say the note, but i'm getting there yeah.
#4
There are dozens of "exotic" scales to step into. I'm particularly fond of the symmetrical scale. At the point of memorization for your aforementioned list of scales, I'd work more on being able to incorporate them better and gradually get into some of the modes.
#5
i'd start learning intervals and making your own scales. thats what i do, you can get some really cool sounding stuff by mixing and matching like scales.
#6
Really, all you need to know is the major, pentatonic, and any that aren't modes of those. Because once you know major, you know a minor. A minor is just C major played with A as the root, and E phyrigian is just A minor with E as the root. And B locrian is just E phyrigian with B as the root. It goes on like that, so essentially, you need 1 scale, and where those notes are on all over the fretboard, not just in the standardly taught box.
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#7
First , I'd learn the notes of the board really well. Then the major scale, and maybe the pentatonic. Then before going into anymore, I'd learn application of these scales. You don't typically learn long division at the same time as addition. You first learn addition, then learn to apply it, then subtraction... etc. Take your time, slow down a bit perhaps.
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#8
Quote by nightwind
First , I'd learn the notes of the board really well. Then the major scale, and maybe the pentatonic. Then before going into anymore, I'd learn application of these scales. You don't typically learn long division at the same time as addition. You first learn addition, then learn to apply it, then subtraction... etc. Take your time, slow down a bit perhaps.

well right, i have written quite a few songs and know how to apply scales (i do know a lot of major and minor pent as well as some natural minor positions in various keys, but i could use a refresher.), but my goal is to become a session musician and my guitar teacher said that i'd need to know every scale and chord voicing as a start, so i'm working on that. yeah i'm aware that major and minor scales aren't that different, but i think it's easier to just memorize all of them then to figure out the differences, if that made any sense.

but yeah, thanks for the replies.
#9
Quote by Spamwise
well right, i have written quite a few songs and know how to apply scales (i do know a lot of major and minor pent as well as some natural minor positions in various keys, but i could use a refresher.), but my goal is to become a session musician and my guitar teacher said that i'd need to know every scale and chord voicing as a start, so i'm working on that. yeah i'm aware that major and minor scales aren't that different, but i think it's easier to just memorize all of them then to figure out the differences, if that made any sense.

but yeah, thanks for the replies.


Well, I really don't think you need all the tools if you don't know how to use them. . . .
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#10
Quote by nightwind
Well, I really don't think you need all the tools if you don't know how to use them. . . .

I agree, but like I said I do know how to use them as I can improvise and write music fairly well. Unless you meant something else.
#11
Check out the whole tone scale.
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#12
Have you learned each scale over the entire fretboard?
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#13
Quote by Archeo Avis
Have you learned each scale over the entire fretboard?

This is what I'm working on. Each day I memorize the one position of every scale i'm working on for a certain key, so by the end of the week i have every position in those scales memorized in that key.

hey can anyone help me out? when i play melodic minor ascending it's fine but when it descends it wants to resolve to G (i'm playing in A.).
#14
Quote by Spamwise
This is what I'm working on. Each day I memorize the one position of every scale i'm working on for a certain key, so by the end of the week i have every position in those scales memorized in that key.

hey can anyone help me out? when i play melodic minor ascending it's fine but when it descends it wants to resolve to G (i'm playing in A.).


Don't bother descending in Aeolian. It's very rarely done nowadays. In jazz, you use the Melodic minor ascending and descending.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.