#1
Ok, I'm new here, so hi everyone.

Anyways, here's my problem.

I've had my Epiphone Les Paul Custom for about a month now, and it's been having intonation problems ever since I got it.

About 2 weeks ago, I took it to a repair shop to have the intonation fixed, and new pickups put in.

However, today when I went to go tune it up, the intonation was WAY off, and it really annoys me cause I feel like I wasted $150 dollars for useless repairs on my guitar. (Note: I tune in E flat, and the string's are D'addario 10's)

Taking the guitar back to where I got it is sort of out of the question, because my father bought the guitar for me down in DC where he lives, being that I live in cold Upstate New York. (Which is another thing, does the cold weather have to do anything with it?)

I recorded the guitar tunings in terms of each string and each frets tuning, in +/-'s. Here is the link: http://www.geocities.com/peddlersofdeth/geetar.txt

The low E string's saddle is pushed back as far as it can go, so saddle compensation is out of the question, so I've been looking into nut compensation.

Now my question is this: Is there anything that I can do to PERMANENTLY fix this horrid problem of intonation? And will a compensated nut (ex: Earvana) help the intonation by any chance?

Because if my guitar is screwed, I'm gonna be really really ticked off, cause if my guitar is always gonna have this problem, I might as well throw it in the trash.

-Drew
#2
Maybe i misunderstood, but i assume those were cents, so if you had -cents your guitar is going flat. but to raise the intonation sharper, shouldn't you be moving the saddle forward? Also the GBE strings don't look that bad, as if they are cents, 1 cent isn't a hige difference. I notice there is a bit of a change in the middle of the neck, perhaps the neck is too bowed? I was told that having the neck too bowed effects intonation. Also, if your action is too low, especially on the lower strings, how hard you press the string down will effect intonation. If i was you, i would check your saddle adjustments, check the notes, and raise your bridge slightly!