#1
Is it spelt argepeggiating? And does that mean playing other notes over the root note in the same scale, as in If by Red Hot Chili Peppers?
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#2
It's spelled "arpeggiating". And it means playing notes in the same chord, not scale. So, if the chord is A Major, you would play the notes A, E, and C#.
#3
Is this the technique used in If - RHCP? If not, what is the technique in that song called.
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#4
It could be but I think what you might be talking about is that pedal tone kind of thing. He plays a note lets it ring(probably an open string) and then plays a melody over top of that. That's probably what you're talking about. But he's probably using chord tones and arpeggiating in some way with the melody.
#5
Arpeggiating is when you play the notes in a chord separately.

Here's an example

Gmaj7

G]-----------------------
D]--------------4-------
A]-----2---5------------
E]-3---------------------
#6
Arpeggios are a way for the bass guitar to interpret chords and chord patterns. They are a essential part of bass theory and if you end up playing jazz, they become essential as a technique. In bass playing, there are basic arpeggio shapes for playing chords; if you want to dig into this topic further, Hal Leonard has a rather extensive book on the subject:

http://www.guitarcenter.com/shop/product/buy_hal_leonard_bass_arpeggio_finder_by_chad_johnson_book?full_sku=102918661&src=4WFRWXX

They are great for learning your fret board, your chord structures and your chord progressions.

EDIT: For an example of their usage in rock bass playing, see Noel Redding's bass line for "Manic Depression".
Last edited by anarkee at Feb 20, 2007,
#7
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
It could be but I think what you might be talking about is that pedal tone kind of thing. He plays a note lets it ring(probably an open string) and then plays a melody over top of that. That's probably what you're talking about. But he's probably using chord tones and arpeggiating in some way with the melody.

Is there a certain note for that? When you play a note, lets it ring and plays a melody over top of it. Flea does it in If and Pretty Little Ditty.
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#8
It's a pedal tone it depends on what chord you're playing. Sometimes it could be the root of the chord other times it could be the root of the scale you're playing the chord of if you're playing diatonic sevenths but that's beside the point. I'm guessing a player like Flea will play the root of the chord as a pedal tone. In jazz it's a little more open with pedal tones because *usually* the baritone sax will play the pedal tone and then the rest of the saxes will play the melody over top so there would be a chance for possibly harmonizing the pedal tone... I digress Flea will most likely be playing the root of the chord and then melody overtop.