#1
I read somewhere that any combination of 3 or more notes can be named (meaning major, minor, suspended, diminished, add, omit, etc.).

What would a combination of minor 2nds be named, say, C, C#, and D?

Yes, I know this would sound awful, I'm just curious.
Quote by cubedeathk

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#2
It could be callled, Csus2addb2no5 or C#maj7addb9no5 (I can't think anything with D as the root), but three consecutive chromatic tones are not really a part of western music (someone phrase that better).
#3
Quote by bangoodcharlote
It could be callled, Csus2addb2no5 or C#maj7addb9no5 (I can't think anything with D as the root), but three consecutive chromatic tones are not really a part of western music (someone phrase that better).


Ah, okay. Thanks.

And while we're at it, I believe the definition of a chord is a combination of three notes or more played simultaneously. Now, would a power chord with the root, fifth, and octave be considered a chord even though an interval is repeated? I've heard people say that it would and people say that it wouldn't.
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#4
Quote by QuiteTheFellow
Ah, okay. Thanks.

And while we're at it, I believe the definition of a chord is a combination of three notes or more played simultaneously. Now, would a power chord with the root, fifth, and octave be considered a chord even though an interval is repeated? I've heard people say that it would and people say that it wouldn't.



The amount of times an interval appears does not change what it is, no.
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#6
Quote by psychodelia
I think it'd be a chromatic tone cluster.


Thats what it would be. A cluster, because its a cluster of notes.

And for the power chord thing, I dont think they are chords. It is missing the 3rd so that doesnt really qualify it as anything. All power chords are are shortened barre chords.
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#7
Quote by justin_fraser
And for the power chord thing, I dont think they are chords. It is missing the 3rd so that doesnt really qualify it as anything. All power chords are are shortened barre chords.
A chord doesn't need a third. A sus chord is a legit chord.
#8
Quote by bangoodcharlote
A chord doesn't need a third. A sus chord is a legit chord.

It would need a third to be called a major or minor though right?
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#10
from what I know of chords it just needs to be 3 different notes im not sure though, since a power chord has an octave I dont think it's technically a chord it's actually closer to a double stop but i've always called it a chord.
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#11
All chords have to have at least 3 notes, thats why they are called triads anything beyond 3 notes (7ths 9ths ect.) are chord extensions. A chord doesn't have to have a 3rd . A sus chord doesn't have a 3rd but it has a 2nd instead still 3 notes. A "power chord" usually called a power 5 chord isn't really a chord it's an interval. Just 2 notes, the root or tonic and a 5th. Same thing with parallel 4th double stops. these are intervals not chords.