#1
Ok, I have this book. I wanted to learn scales and this book had lots of good praise. So I'm going through it and I learn the C-A-G-E-D system for chords, still need to work on changing chords, and I then dive into the C-A-G-E-D system for Major Pentatonic scales. I learning them now. I've got C, A, and G mastered I can play them forwards and backwards. I have a poster of scales from Hal Leonard, and it has 10 scales for each note, A, A#, B, ect... I'm looking at it and it has Major Pentatonic Scales that differ from the book. Plus it has repeating forms over the entire poster for different scales.

The book goes about it that you can take the scale form for C Major Pentatonic in the open position and move it down fret by fret and it changes it down one step. So if I go to fret one it is C#, fret 2 it is D, and continuing down the fret board. Is the poster using the same idea that you can have so many different forms and just move them around to create different scales? Or is the book completely messed up. It does not seemed to be wrong. If you can take any scale you play and move it down the fretboard to create the next lower scale then stuff for me just clicked. Any links to help me understand this would be great.

Here are my examples for you...

C Major Pentatonic Form (from the book) X denotes what you should play:

e| X |   |   | X |
B|   | X |   | X |
G| X |   | X |   |
D| X |   | X |   |
A| X |   |   | X |
E| X |   |   | X |


C Major Pentatonic Form in Open position Tab:


e |------------------------------------0--3--|
B |-----------------------------1--3---------|
G |----------------------0--2----------------|
D |---------------0--2-----------------------|
A |--------0--3------------------------------|
E |-0--3-------------------------------------|


Now if I was to move them down one fret would it be C# Major Pentatonic? I really don't want to learn it all this way then screw it up and have to relearn everything all over again.

For my poster it has C Major scale then right below it exactly note for note is C#/Db scale, just on a diffrent starting fret. C Major on the poster is at the 7th fret and C#/Db is at the 8th fret.
A guitar is your personality expressed through 6 strings.
Last edited by chaoticgeek at Feb 21, 2007,
#2
Quote by chaoticgeek


e |------------------------------------1--4--|
B |-----------------------------2--4---------|
G |----------------------0--3----------------|
D |---------------0--3-----------------------|
A |--------0--4------------------------------|
E |-0--4-------------------------------------|

That isn't a C major pentatonic scale.


Anyway, if you have an A major scale with the root on the 5th fret and move it down one fret to fret 4, you now have an Ab major scale. If you move the A scale up three frets to fret 8, you have a C major scale.

Does that answer your question?
#4
scales are kinds like bar chords as you move them around the fret the root note changes and then it becomes that chord same for a scale a major scale has a major root not of a,b,c.etc. or a#,B#etc.(same for flat)its just the same formation same for minor wow just wait till you get to stuff like phrygian dorian aeolian your really gonna lose your mind it confused the hell out of me but some how it made sense
#5
yes if you move the C scales down one fret you will have the C# scales.... and there is no C on any 7th fret.. assuming your in natural tuning. there is a C on both E strings at 8.. but not 7

you say the poster says C is on fret 7? throw it away.
#7
no one semi tone below c is b# two semitones below c is b two semitones=one natural note
#9
uhhh.. maybe you confused down with up.

i consider going from fret 1 to fret 2 moving down the board... seeing how the headstock is at the top of the guitar
#10
i always though that that would be up seeing how the notes get higher in pitch as you go towards the bridge
#11
Quote by warriorde52
no one semi tone below c is b# two semitones below c is b two semitones=one natural note


no thats completely wrong..

B# is C

take a look at a piano
#12
Quote by warriorde52
i always though that that would be up seeing how the notes get higher in pitch as you go towards the bridge


i guess ive just been refering to it that was cause of the physical guitar body.. not its sound
#13
what huh thanx i always thought that one semitone below a note is a sharp or flat???or is there no b#
#14
Quote by warriorde52
i always though that that would be up seeing how the notes get higher in pitch as you go towards the bridge
That's what I do and that's what most people do. That's what we should go with.
#15
Quote by bangoodcharlote
That's what I do and that's what most people do. That's what we should go with.


im with you
#16
Quote by warriorde52
what huh thanx i always thought that one semitone below a note is a sharp or flat???or is there no b#
There is one semitone between B and C. That means that the chromatic scale goes A A# B C C#. B#=C and Cb=B. The notes B# and Cb exist, but they are not very common.

Likewise, there is one semitone between E and F. The same rules apply.

Why we decided to make music like this, I have no clue. But that's what we do.
#18
I think I screwed up some of my wording... When I said move it down one step, I mean go one fret to the bridge, and away from the headstock. Like go down by moving from fret 5 to 6... Although your going up in numbers so I was just confused by that and I have it fixed in my head as going down is moving away from the headstock. I'm a complete noob so sorry if I confused anyone. I'm not saying there is a C on the 7th fret, I'm saying you play in C Major Scale on the 7th fret. This is the diagram it gives me for C Major on the 7th Fret:

    7   8   9  10
e | X | X |   |   |
B |   | X |   | X |
G | X |   | X | X |
D | X |   | X | X |
A | X | X |   | X |
E |   | X |   | X |


Then it has C#/Db Major Scale and it gives me this diagram:

    8   9   10  11
e | X | X |   |   |
B |   | X |   | X |
G | X |   | X | X |
D | X |   | X | X |
A | X | X |   | X |
E |   | X |   | X |


I also edited my orginal post because I messed up on the C Major Pentatonic Scale Tab...
A guitar is your personality expressed through 6 strings.
Last edited by chaoticgeek at Feb 21, 2007,
#19
Quote by warriorde52
so therefore its just b,c and e,f that only have one semitone
Well, no, every consecutive note group has a semitone between the two notes, but B, C and E, F are the only pairs of notes without sharps and flats attached that have only one semitone between them.
#21
wow so then G is really singled out in music isnt it
hey thanx for the advice thats why sometimes my fret board didnt make since
#22
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Well, no, every consecutive note group has a semitone between the two notes, but B, C and E, F are the only pairs of notes without sharps and flats attached that have only one semitone between them.


sorry thats kind of what i meant theres just no sharps or flats between then cause isnt a sharp or flat a semitone
#23
Quote by warriorde52
wow so then G is really singled out in music isnt it
hey thanx for the advice thats why sometimes my fret board didnt make since
What?

Quote by warriorde52
sorry thats kind of what i meant
I know, I just being silly.

Regardless, what I said was correct.
#24
thanks BGC for clearing that up.. i had a big thing typed out on enharmonics(one note with two names {ie B#-C, Fb-E, A#-Bb.. ect}) and my damn comp froze up..

i dunno where i got my terms from as for the up/down.. guess i wasnt thinkin musically :P

and geek.. yeah those looks right to me. also, id try to just refer to those enharmonics (C#/Db) as one note (C#) after you get better at guitar and theory youll know that it has two names (most notes have 3 names!!)
#25
never mind im ****ing tired as hell i didnt sleep at all last night i seriously jammed for like 24 hours and im ready to crash so my brain aint workin right
#26
Ok, I'm still wondering if my whole theory is correct. I take any scale, you pick it at whatever fret you start on. First fret, tenth fret, whatever. Can you move that scale down or up to create a different scale with that same exact finger positioning? If my scale goes fret 1--3--4 on each string can I move down so it is 2--4--5 and it is the same exact scale only sharp? Like if my orginal 1--3--4 was A MajorGeek scale (made up of course) and I moved it to 2--3--4 it would be A# MajorGeek scale correct? I'm not saying that would make an A scale I'm just using that as an example for me to try to explain what I'm thinking as words.

If so I could just have all the different forums and memorize them and figure out how everything works as far as scales from there. If that is how it works then I'm thinking right and I know what I'm doing, if not then I need to find a better book that explains it all a little better.
A guitar is your personality expressed through 6 strings.