#1
how can i make good live recordings of my bands with only two mics?

i've tried to record the parts seperately but it just doesnt sound good, it doesnt sound "together" if you know what i mean
my usb interface only has two mic inputs and so im trying to work with what i've got

my 1st band consists of...
drums
vocals
guitar
bass

and my 2nd band consists of...
2 guitars
drums
piano
vocals


and by live i dont mean like at a gig, i mean all of the band together playing at the same time
#3
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Edit - And to threadstarter, IMO you should just work on making yourselves sound more together, because your sound quality definitely won't be as good with just some mics....
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Last edited by eckmann88 at Feb 21, 2007,
#4
Tagged. Thanks for the report.
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#5
my band has the same problem except we only have one mic, but the problem will be mixing so what i recommend you do is, set up 1 mic in the center of everyone about 8 feet in the air facing down, and find a decent mix and record it. Then starting with drums have him play along with the recording on a seperate track. do that with each part and you can also do solos seperatly so you can focus on them.
#7
When you are recording your tracks individually, try playing with a drum machine. This should keep you guys together. Then record your drums and take out the drum machine, you should have a decent mix.
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#8
If you have two mics, one Idea would be to set up a coincident pair (Search it on google or something. Though you may not have the right equipment for it I dunno) That way you can get a good stereo live take. After that I would use the recording as a guide track and record, starting with drums and working your way towards the vocals.

If you need any claification don't hesitate to ask me. I'll try and use my music Technology knowledge for you :P

Describe your situation a bit clearer, maybe?
Last edited by Of_Wolves at Feb 22, 2007,
#11
Quote by Of_Wolves
If you have two mics, one Idea would be to set up a coincident pair (Search it on google or something. Though you may not have the right equipment for it I dunno) That way you can get a good stereo live take. After that I would use the recording as a guide track and record, starting with drums and working your way towards the vocals.

If you need any claification don't hesitate to ask me. I'll try and use my music Technology knowledge for you :P

Describe your situation a bit clearer, maybe?



i looked up coincident miking and that sounds like a good idea, then using that as a guide track should work thanks

as for describing my situation better the two mics i have are an mxl 990(condenser) and an mxl 991(pencil mic) and i usually record my band in my room or my upstairs since my computer is upstairs and its not a laptop so i cant move it around and also my 1st band plays rock/alternative and my second band plays soft rock if that helps
#12
dude we had the same problem and we fixed it
just record everything separately and then mix the different tracks together
drums first and then the rest put one mic in the kick and one over the cymbals we manage to make it work well that way . If your drummer can't play the song like that without the rest of the band playing (as it is often the case), just play a guitar part in an while he's playing (plug headphones and give them to your drummer at the same time. that way he'll be able to hear the guitar and know what to play at the right time adn at the same time the mic won't pick up what your guitar's playing). Then what you do is use the headphones again this time you plug them on your computer so the guitarits can hear the drums and play their stuff over then vocals and that's it.
that's cheap mutlitrack for you, we make it work rather nicely. Not like the pros but good nonetheless

hope that helped and i was clear enough
#13
Hm I would say you have two options:
1 - Buy a new audio interface with say, two line inputs and two mic inputs. Then, patch the output from the guitar and bass, through any FX pedals (or even amps) in to the line inputs, and use one mic for drums and one for vocals. Go live and then you can mix down every instrument individually afterwards with software such as Cubase (if you want to spend money, Cubase is your best bet) or Audacity, which is free but doesn't have the same features.
OR
2 - using your existing interface, record every instrument individually, starting with drums (if your drummer can keep a speed and the right beat for the whole track) or bass (ditto). Then, just layer everything on top and mix it with software (again, Cubase or Audacity.)

Hope this helps a bit.
Last edited by dan-the-man278 at Feb 24, 2007,
#14
my interface has that i just like micing my amps better but i guess i'll try that, also the only way i can do that is to plug it in through the headphone jack on the amp and that "cuts" the sound on the amp

whenever i record seperately i always do guitar first and then build from there, is this a bad way to seprately record tracks because ya'll were talking about recording drums first so idk

also im thinkin about getting new software. either pro tools m-powered or cakewalk sonar 4 home studio, the pro tools is about $150 more expensive but then again its pro tools what do you guys think i should get?
#15
when you record separately, you should start with the hardest things to mix first - drums, then bass, then guitar, then vocals.


My friend recently got pro tools and he has owned Cakewalk in the past, but he has said protools blows everything else out of the water. So I'd recommend getting that. Or Cakewalk and then an additional mic. lol
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#16
we were in the exact same situation not long ago with our band, at first we did like you did so that's one mic and the whole band playing at the same time it works but you can get a much cleaner and more distinct sound for each instrument by multitrack. We usually do drums first because it's easier then to record and layer. If it cuts the sound when you plug the headphones it's suppopsed to be good, only the drummer will be able to hear what yout guitar player is playing so when you layer the tracks you wil have a 100 percent drum track and it'll be clearer.Your guitar player's role is important only if your drummer can't play the parts on his own just like that. If your guitar player also needs a guide u'll have to rehearse untuil he or she naisls the parts down i guess

I've heard that pro tools is in fact extremely hard to use because it's what the pros use producers and mixer people who are very qualified usually, so if u get that make sure you're extremely documented first otherwise like that over guy said get cubase that's what we got it's a bit difficult at first but we've managed to make it work so there's no reason you could'nt and the results are quite good actually. We got cubase for free at the shop when we bought a soundcard , the guy wanted to sell us sonar anyway but it was like 100 bucks and in then end I think it wasn't that necessry

good luck !
#17
thats the only thing about pro tools i dont want anything thats super difficult to use but at the same time i want something that will work really well, i was looking online to see if there were any tutorials to pro tools and there are actually college courses on how to use pro tools
#18
try audacity or cubase first and you'll see that these need some concentration and time to master, but if you feel up to it you might as well try pro tools the sound quality must be virtually like in a studio !

I think audacity's free though so maybe it could give you a taste
If you have a mac I've heard that garageband is amazingly simple and gives good results
you might like to check this link out too http://homerecording.about.com/
#19
i looked at audacity and it looks almost exactly like my current software(cakewalk music creator 2) and i've pretty much mastered how to use that

yeah i wish i had a mac so i could have gargeband, my old bassist who moved away has garageband but he doesnt know how to use it and/or doesnt want to use it

i think im gonna end up getting pro tools
has anyone ever used pro tools?
#20
we had a problem getting the timing down individually when we were trying to record some stuff so we would record all together one one track. then have the drummer drum along with headphones on another track while the other thing was being played. then we would delete the track where we all played together then do all the other instruments separatley. ide say drums is the hardest thing to lay down. once you get a drum track, its easy.
#21
Quote by UtBDan
My friend recently got pro tools and he has owned Cakewalk in the past, but he has said protools blows everything else out of the water.


Your friend speaks the truth sir. Protools IS the best.

Your best bet would be to get a cheap mixer (an 8 track BEHRINGER or similar perhaps) to mike the drums with, set the level right, and then line them in to the interface, and use the other input on perhaps the bass, with the other instruments playing along.

Then go back and add vocals and guitars separately.

If you wanted a deluxe guitar sound with more than 2 mics you could try using the mixer for that as well.
#22
ide say drums is the hardest thing to lay down. once you get a drum track, its easy.


Hipster also speaks the truth.

i think im gonna end up getting pro tools
has anyone ever used pro tools?


I am an avid pro tools user. I think it’s an excellent program. I wasn’t shown how to use it, but I picked up the basics within a few weeks.

Digidesign offer various training courses in how it works, which could be worth, plus they have tutorial videos on their websites.

This might just be me, but I believe that if you can use protools, you can use anything.

If you’re thinking of getting an M box, which is most likely I guess, you’ll want to retain audacity.

This is because you can check the overall volume, trim the start and end of the track and edit the ID3 tags and export MP3s, with negligible loss to sound quality. In other words, it’s a useful program for primitive mastering. Otherwise, you would be able to do these things in the HD version.

Apologies for the double post, my computer crashes if I make posts too long.
#23
i use sony acid its a music studio program its great... although it wasnt worth it too much for the price but u can record seperately and put them together.
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#24
what my band does is we usually do
drums and guitar - or - drums and bass (which ever supports the whole song more)

then add each other instrument seperatly
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#25
When i went to a cheap studio to record, they first recorded the drums. They done this by plugging the guitar into the amp, and sticking some headphones from the amp on the drummer so he could hear it but the mics for the drum kit wouldnt pick any of the sound up from the guitar. Once the drums were there we put in all the instruments one by one, which was easy cause we had the drum beat. And then at the end record the vocals.
Also we had parts where the drummer didnt play, so he was told to just tap the hi-hat to keep the beat and then later they cut that part out.
Hope that helps.