#1
I've been playing for many years and I can improvise decent sounding solos all day using pentatonic shapes, blues scales and so on.
While I can do a pretty good Tony Iommi impression, and it gets me by in some situations, I can't improvise a shred/metal style solo.
I know the scale shapes (well, I'm getting to know them) and I can write solos step by step, slowly but I can't improv them on the fly.
Is it just a case of learning the scale shapes better?
Whenever I try it sounds like someone playing scales, or parts of scales.
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My Band - Haemasmtha
#2
You can try go Lamb of God on this and try learn an Egyptian scale.
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#3
Think of how you apply the knoweldge you have now to your soloing. The extra notes arent hard to incorporate. Infact how you use a scale relys mostly on what kind of chords being used and your phrasing. I would suggest becoming familar with the major scale and how to apply the modes of it, once you've got a firm grasp on that it'll be easy to improvise and lay on the right notes.
#4
i found it helpful to think of soloing as a type of singing. when people sing they don't just continuously put out note after note in the same timing. play a long legato thing followed by a held bend. in other words, break a 'paragraph' of music up into sentences and allow the different sections to be heard. it's as much of what you don't play as what you do play.
#5
^That's a good way to see it.

I visualize sooing as singing also. Vibrato anyone?
Co-Founder of the Orange Revolution Club


-Esp/Ltd Ec-1000 w/ BKP Mules
-2-channel Titan
-Oversized Bogner 2x12 Cabinet
-Fulltone OCD
-RMC Picture Wah
-T.C. Electronic Nova Delay
-Larrivee D-03R
#6
Quote by controlfreak
i found it helpful to think of soloing as a type of singing. when people sing they don't just continuously put out note after note in the same timing. play a long legato thing followed by a held bend. in other words, break a 'paragraph' of music up into sentences and allow the different sections to be heard. it's as much of what you don't play as what you do play.


+1, this is a great way of explaining phrasing.
#7
You just need to learn more fast licks/combination of them and incorporate them in your own interpretation. Learn the whole of your fretboard and not just the box shape, that extremely limits your overall range and whatnot.

Hell, you dont even need those egyptian/arabic/Martian scales for all i care, if you can do them in basic major/minor and its good enough. Expand from there. Improvising takes time, listen to a lot of instumentals/solos so that you could get some rough idea on how to do them. Jamming along songs also helps.

For simple/single/short notes, its pretty straight forward.
"Play with your ears" - Yngwie Malmsteen, Paul Gilbert
Thats what she said...
UGmusic
#8
I think the problem is I probably haven't practiced it enough, and I'm thinking about it too much.
Improvising in a pentatonic style I know where I can slide or bend up two frets and it'll sound good, I know loads of stock phrases that can be thrown in at any time.
I guess I'm just not as familiar with the positions used in fast, modern metal style solos.
Plus it's all played so fast there's no time to think "where am I going next?".

I reckon I need a "bluffers guide" - learn these shapes and patterns and playe them all over the place.
Main Gear:
Ibanez RG550EX
Ibanez S470
Epiphone SG CS Ltd Ed 1966 Reissue
Cort M200/WS
Richwood RS17CCE acoustic
Hayden Mofo
Harley Benton 2x12 Celestion V30

My Band - Haemasmtha
#9
Hold on now, dont get too stuck on the basic pentatonic shape, there arent many notes in there. Expand more by understanding the basic major and minor more so that you can achieve those 3 notes per string licks better.

If you tend to do a lot of bends and stick too much to the basic minor/major pentatonic shape, it'll sound too bluesy and you dont want that.
"Play with your ears" - Yngwie Malmsteen, Paul Gilbert
Thats what she said...
UGmusic
#11
Quote by madpickin03
Hold on now, dont get too stuck on the basic pentatonic shape, there arent many notes in there. Expand more by understanding the basic major and minor more so that you can achieve those 3 notes per string licks better.

If you tend to do a lot of bends and stick too much to the basic minor/major pentatonic shape, it'll sound too bluesy and you dont want that.


No no - exactly. I basically taught myself starting that way and I'm pretty happy with my playing in that style.

I want to expand my soloing style to something more modern, more metal.
I can play the stuff reasonably well if I sit down and write the solo, by a combination of knowing what notes are in the scale and hearing where I want to go in my head and finding it on the fretboard.

But it is doing this at speed in the context of a song which I have trouble with.
Main Gear:
Ibanez RG550EX
Ibanez S470
Epiphone SG CS Ltd Ed 1966 Reissue
Cort M200/WS
Richwood RS17CCE acoustic
Hayden Mofo
Harley Benton 2x12 Celestion V30

My Band - Haemasmtha
#12
Just do those boring drills and whatnot, it helps. Practice over a metronome. There's no easy way out of it other than practicing. GL
"Play with your ears" - Yngwie Malmsteen, Paul Gilbert
Thats what she said...
UGmusic
#13
Quote by madpickin03
There's no easy way out of it other than practicing. GL



Damn, I was hoping there was!!
Main Gear:
Ibanez RG550EX
Ibanez S470
Epiphone SG CS Ltd Ed 1966 Reissue
Cort M200/WS
Richwood RS17CCE acoustic
Hayden Mofo
Harley Benton 2x12 Celestion V30

My Band - Haemasmtha