#1
ive got a greco strat copy that was painted a baby blue color...i accidentally chipped the paint and it seems like whoever painted it just sprayed over the original sunburst color, even leaving the clear coat on. So im thinking i would like to remove the blue color and bring it back to the original

anyone have a good idea as to how to do this without damaging the original sunburst?
#2
well if they left the clear coat, you should be able to sand it with really fine sandpaper to get rid of the blue. i'd use a sanding block wherever possible. don't sand through the clear, just get down to it. then clean it and re-clear it. and finish normally. it'll take a while but should be possible.
#3
Quote by mjs3350
well if they left the clear coat, you should be able to sand it with really fine sandpaper to get rid of the blue. i'd use a sanding block wherever possible. don't sand through the clear, just get down to it. then clean it and re-clear it. and finish normally. it'll take a while but should be possible.


400 grit maybe? i just have to be really careful around the edges especially..i dont want to sand to much...im not worried about stripping the original clear coat in the process, since its no big deal to go over that..its more the sunburst i want to keep protected

the paint does chip off with a chisel, but it leaves marks so im ruling that out
#4
Yeah, take extra care sanding the topcoat. Don't use a chisel or any pointy instrument to remove the opaque coat. I agree that you should go for the Sunburst, then clearcoat it.

I've seen a really old Cream or Vintage White Strat where it was so reliced that underneath portions of the Cream/White that wore off, it was a beautiful matte Sunburst. I'm going to attempt a Sunburst later, clearcoat it, then paint it Surf Green. In 20 or 30 years, the natural relicing will expose the Sunburst.
#5
Quote by Ippon
Yeah, take extra care sanding the topcoat. Don't use a chisel or any pointy instrument to remove the opaque coat. I agree that you should go for the Sunburst, then clearcoat it.

I've seen a really old Cream or Vintage White Strat where it was so reliced that underneath portions of the Cream/White that wore off, it was a beautiful matte Sunburst. I'm going to attempt a Sunburst later, clearcoat it, then paint it Surf Green. In 20 or 30 years, the natural relicing will expose the Sunburst.


its actually coming along really well, ive only done a small portion on the back (about the size of a hand)...It has been primed too. but i think i've found a pretty good method of removing the paint while not damaging the original sunburst

remove the top layer of paint with 300-400 grit paper

when you hit the primer, get 400 grit (or higher), put some mineral spirits on the paper (mineral spirits are a less harsh than varnish or thinner)...kind of like wet sanding, be really careful and go in circular patterns until the original finish is exposed

so far its worked well...and ive found that the sunburst on my guitar is more like that old style "tobacco" looking burst..ill post before after pics when its all finished
#6
400 grit? That's not too abrasive? If I were just sanding one coat off, I'd probably be going with at least 800 to be safe, but I don't know much about guitars as opposed to normal spray paint. Is there much of a difference?
#7
Quote by Aetii
400 grit? That's not too abrasive? If I were just sanding one coat off, I'd probably be going with at least 800 to be safe, but I don't know much about guitars as opposed to normal spray paint. Is there much of a difference?


400 works well with what im trying to do, it takes the clear coat off but the original finish is preserved fine