#2
usually they're the same, don't think size matters either.
Gibson SG Standard + 18volt EMG-81 & 85
Mesa/Boogie Mark IV + Recto 2x12
Keeley Modded BD-2
Vox V847a
Quote by one vision
Bureaucrats gonna crat.

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A Who To Listen To List 2008
#3
Quote by UnsignedRecords
usually they're the same, don't think size matters either.


Alright, so I don't have to get a whole bunch of pedals to plug into the effects processor, right?
#4
Yeah, pretty much an effects processor is just a bunch of effects thrown into one. You may think that's a good thing, but it's a bit of a double-edged sword so to speak. While you are getting a lot of effects, they usually aren't as good of a quality as just a single effect.

I for one own a Digitech RP200, and it has some decent effects, but I would much rather have single pedals for what I need.
#5
Quote by Shawn5961
Yeah, pretty much an effects processor is just a bunch of effects thrown into one. You may think that's a good thing, but it's a bit of a double-edged sword so to speak. While you are getting a lot of effects, they usually aren't as good of a quality as just a single effect.

I for one own a Digitech RP200, and it has some decent effects, but I would much rather have single pedals for what I need.


I know, the single effects own the multiple ones most of the time. My plan is to keep my Electro Harmonix reverb pedal and sell my crappy distortion and volume pedals for an effects processor I tried out at a friends house. (Boss GT-6, to be exact)

Plus, too many effects pedals can have you ending up doing a tap dance during a gig .
#6
Quote by ih8u2
I know, the single effects own the multiple ones most of the time. My plan is to keep my Electro Harmonix reverb pedal and sell my crappy distortion and volume pedals for an effects processor I tried out at a friends house. (Boss GT-6, to be exact)

Plus, too many effects pedals can have you ending up doing a tap dance during a gig .

the distortion on multi-effect pedals are usually pretty digital, but if you're willing to sacrifice some tone, meh go for it.

and it's a bitch using them in a live situation because like in my rp300 everything has to be in some specific order to not look stupid while i'm playing haha.
Gibson SG Standard + 18volt EMG-81 & 85
Mesa/Boogie Mark IV + Recto 2x12
Keeley Modded BD-2
Vox V847a
Quote by one vision
Bureaucrats gonna crat.

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A Who To Listen To List 2008
#7
Quote by ih8u2
I know, the single effects own the multiple ones most of the time. My plan is to keep my Electro Harmonix reverb pedal and sell my crappy distortion and volume pedals for an effects processor I tried out at a friends house. (Boss GT-6, to be exact)

Plus, too many effects pedals can have you ending up doing a tap dance during a gig .


Yeah, that's the one thing I love about multi effects. I signed up to play guitar, I didn't expect to be dancing while doing it.
#8
Quote by UnsignedRecords
the distortion on multi-effect pedals are usually pretty digital, but if you're willing to sacrifice some tone, meh go for it.

and it's a bitch using them in a live situation because like in my rp300 everything has to be in some specific order to not look stupid while i'm playing haha.



Yeah, I'm pretty much the same way as you. I use a Tubescreamer for my distortion, and with my RP200, I keep things as organized as possible. Hell, when I was still in a band, before every gig I would reorganize the effects so that they were in order; Just kept pressing up over and over.
#9
yeah, tapdancing sucks. If you have cash though, I've seen a lot of pro rigs with loop switchers. The pedals on the loops are always on, but the loops are bypassed. You use a pedal board with a control unit, and you can program it to turn on/off/combine the different loops. This way you get combinations of the single pedals without the tapdance routine. ie GCX Groundcontrol
"The fool doth think he is wise, but the wiseman knows himself to be a fool." - W.S.
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#10
Erock503 - yeah, tapdancing sucks. If you have cash though, I've seen a lot of pro rigs with loop switchers. The pedals on the loops are always on, but the loops are bypassed. You use a pedal board with a control unit, and you can program it to turn on/off/combine the different loops. This way you get combinations of the single pedals without the tapdance routine. ie GCX Groundcontrol

- - - - - - - - - - - - -

That route is quite sweet, but it causes a couple of issues.

1. The rig requires a lot of space. If you were to put all of this together, you would need to make room on your pedalboard for the rackmount switcher as well as the MIDI foot controller and any extra expression pedals you wanted/needed. The foot controller is fairly large and it takes up quite a bit of real estate. And if you didn't want to put all of this on the floor, you'd have to put together a rack, which makes things a lot neater, but it's yet another large box you have to tote around to shows/practice/whatever.

2. One GCX switcher can only have 8 loops. If you've got more than 8 stomps, you're screwed unless you start combining effects into "channels", but then you're limited because you can't select only 1 of those effects in that "channel". If you want to maintain control over single pedals, you'd have to add GCX units to make up the difference. The cool part is, the GCX Floor Controller can control just about as many units as you need.

3. To really use the GCX to it's full potential, you'll want it to control your amp channel switching as well, but the problem with that is that each tip/sleep relay needs it's own loop. As I mentioned above, the GCX controller can only run 8 loops (unless you add more GCX controllers). I own a Mesa Roadster...there are 4 channels, a solo mode, reverb on/off, and FX loop on/off. That means I've got to take up 7 loops to control these functions. Granted, I could simply ignore some of these functions, but the fact remains that the rig can get fairly expansive depending on your needs.

GCX Switcher - $400
GCX Floor Controller - $400

Keep in mind that buying the floor controller alone does nothing unless you just want a stand-alone MIDI controller. To use the system as a master controller for your effects, you will need both units. Add this to the cost of a rack or a pedalboard, as well as the individual stomp boxes that you want, and you can easily see the prices break the $2000 mark. If I were to build this system up for a client, I would more than likely charge about $280 for the pedalboard with an extra $50 labor + cost of materials to mount and wire up the system. If you can do all of this yourself, cool.

Now, the alternative...

Boss GT-8 - $320 - $400 depending on where you look

Great digital effects - if you set this unit up correctly, it will sound great, but it all depends on your amp. As I've stated in a couple of other threads, this unit worked great for me when I was using a Fender HRD, but now that I've switched over to a Mesa Roadster, the unit just doesn't work out. The Mesa doesn't seem to be able to feed this unit a strong enough signal from the effects loop. I'm currently looking for alternatives, and the GCX system has crossed my mind several times, but for me, it's just not practical. Hauling a rack up and down stairs, along with a speaker cab and amp head is hell. I would want to mount the head in the rack with the switching unit, which makes it all but impossible to move up and down stairs with the combined weight of everything. Having to get to a practice jam and connect 11 cables in and out of the amp to the rack is just asking for problems, including cable shorts, failures, as well as the possibilities of connecting a cable incorrectly and having to troubleshoot when I should be jamming.

Your needs may vary, but look into the many options you have, consider how much you want to spend, then go try stuff out. You'll save a lot of money and pain if you think it all through.
#11
Quote by TwoString
Erock503 - yeah, tapdancing sucks. If you have cash though, I've seen a lot of pro rigs with loop switchers. The pedals on the loops are always on, but the loops are bypassed. You use a pedal board with a control unit, and you can program it to turn on/off/combine the different loops. This way you get combinations of the single pedals without the tapdance routine. ie GCX Groundcontrol

- - - - - - - - - - - - -

That route is quite sweet, but it causes a couple of issues.

1. The rig requires a lot of space. If you were to put all of this together, you would need to make room on your pedalboard for the rackmount switcher as well as the MIDI foot controller and any extra expression pedals you wanted/needed. The foot controller is fairly large and it takes up quite a bit of real estate. And if you didn't want to put all of this on the floor, you'd have to put together a rack, which makes things a lot neater, but it's yet another large box you have to tote around to shows/practice/whatever.

2. One GCX switcher can only have 8 loops. If you've got more than 8 stomps, you're screwed unless you start combining effects into "channels", but then you're limited because you can't select only 1 of those effects in that "channel". If you want to maintain control over single pedals, you'd have to add GCX units to make up the difference. The cool part is, the GCX Floor Controller can control just about as many units as you need.

3. To really use the GCX to it's full potential, you'll want it to control your amp channel switching as well, but the problem with that is that each tip/sleep relay needs it's own loop. As I mentioned above, the GCX controller can only run 8 loops (unless you add more GCX controllers). I own a Mesa Roadster...there are 4 channels, a solo mode, reverb on/off, and FX loop on/off. That means I've got to take up 7 loops to control these functions. Granted, I could simply ignore some of these functions, but the fact remains that the rig can get fairly expansive depending on your needs.

GCX Switcher - $400
GCX Floor Controller - $400

Keep in mind that buying the floor controller alone does nothing unless you just want a stand-alone MIDI controller. To use the system as a master controller for your effects, you will need both units. Add this to the cost of a rack or a pedalboard, as well as the individual stomp boxes that you want, and you can easily see the prices break the $2000 mark. If I were to build this system up for a client, I would more than likely charge about $280 for the pedalboard with an extra $50 labor + cost of materials to mount and wire up the system. If you can do all of this yourself, cool.

Now, the alternative...

Boss GT-8 - $320 - $400 depending on where you look

Great digital effects - if you set this unit up correctly, it will sound great, but it all depends on your amp. As I've stated in a couple of other threads, this unit worked great for me when I was using a Fender HRD, but now that I've switched over to a Mesa Roadster, the unit just doesn't work out. The Mesa doesn't seem to be able to feed this unit a strong enough signal from the effects loop. I'm currently looking for alternatives, and the GCX system has crossed my mind several times, but for me, it's just not practical. Hauling a rack up and down stairs, along with a speaker cab and amp head is hell. I would want to mount the head in the rack with the switching unit, which makes it all but impossible to move up and down stairs with the combined weight of everything. Having to get to a practice jam and connect 11 cables in and out of the amp to the rack is just asking for problems, including cable shorts, failures, as well as the possibilities of connecting a cable incorrectly and having to troubleshoot when I should be jamming.

Your needs may vary, but look into the many options you have, consider how much you want to spend, then go try stuff out. You'll save a lot of money and pain if you think it all through.


I've seen/played with the Boss GT-8, but it's out of my price range. I'm getting a Boss GT-6 for $225. Anyone have experience with the Boss GT-6?