#1
This has probably been asked before, but where is a good place to buy paints. I need a dark red translucent paint and a creame colored paint for my guitar. If it's been asked before then can someone foreward me the thread? thanks
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Customized Fender Lead III (Mary-Lou)
Epiphone Firebird VII Red
Fender MIM Strat Midnight Blue
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#2
hardware stores usually mix paint (and ask them b4 you buy it to make sure it'll work for a guitar) and thats about it...
UG's HIPPIE
#4
I need an arctic white kind of paint but I'm not sure what kind of paint I need... I was told I need something called 2pack or some heavy paint they use on cars n stuff... what kind of paint will I need? I just need a solid white.
#5
Quote by loop-de-luke
I need an arctic white kind of paint but I'm not sure what kind of paint I need... I was told I need something called 2pack or some heavy paint they use on cars n stuff... what kind of paint will I need? I just need a solid white.

Check out Duplicolor (available at most auto supply stores) and their line of acrylic sander/sealer, colorcoat, and clearcoat ... $6/can. Or, try out Krylon acrylic, ~$3/can. Crash used Krylon to paint 3 of Clapton's Strats.
#6
Quote by loop-de-luke
I need an arctic white kind of paint but I'm not sure what kind of paint I need... I was told I need something called 2pack or some heavy paint they use on cars n stuff... what kind of paint will I need? I just need a solid white.



2-pack is a term used to describe one type of automotive paint. It is a catalyzed urethane, and dries to a very durable finish. It does, however, build to a film thickness that traditionalists feel is too thick for a guitar, and affects tone negatively. This has been hotly debated online before.

In any case, the film build thickness is not that great, especially if you colour sand and buff after, which you of course will.

There are 2 types of catalyzed finishes. The first uses a thin color coat, then a clear, catalyzed urethane to give the gloss. This is the "base/clear" system. IMHO, spraying clear is very difficult. The second type is "direct-gloss" urethane, and is normally used for small panel repair on a car. You spray only one type of paint, and it contains the colour and gloss in one step. In the past, it was only available in opaque, non-metallic 'fleet' colours and went by the trade name "Imron" from Dupont. Other manufacturers eventually offered their own (PPG Concept, for one). It is now available in a multitude of metallic colours, but these cannot be colour sanded.

In my experience, Imron is a dream to use, but it requires that you mix up very precise proportions, and 1 litre is the smallest mixed quantity, so you have to mix a full extra litre later for touch-ups, and it is very expensive.

Beware. The catalyst is an isocyanate, and proper respiratory protection is mandatory, but the finished job is well worth it.
Last edited by Vulcan at Feb 23, 2007,
#7
The only equipment I can get my hands on is sanders and buffers at the school I go to and possibly various paint spray guns that my dad's mate has (hes the manager at Solver Paints).... So considering that, what would be my best bet for actual paint kind and stuff?
#8
I would advise you to use nitrocellulose if you plan to keep the guitar for any amount of time. It ages beautifully, and some say that the tone mellows as the finish gets older. It's not as durable, but for a traditionalist, it's the only way.
#9
Quote by loop-de-luke
The only equipment I can get my hands on is sanders and buffers at the school I go to and possibly various paint spray guns that my dad's mate has (hes the manager at Solver Paints).... So considering that, what would be my best bet for actual paint kind and stuff?


Virtually anything will work for you.

Several things to remember:

-You will be sanding wet, by hand, with very fine paper. It will take a long time. I have done entire cars. Be patient.

-A direct gloss enamel will work just fine for you, rather than a 2-pack. 2-packs were developed to maximize paint booth usage. They harden very quickly, allowing the project to be removed from the booth and the next one rolled in. You are not so concerned with that, so a conventional enamel that hardens by evaporation will work just fine. You will have to postpone your wet sanding for a few weeks though.

-Any imperfections (and I mean ANY) in your undercoat will show like a sore thumb when the final coat is dry. Try to find a high-build primer (if you are using an opaque top coat), and wet sand it with 600 grit when it has fully cured. You can use enamel over a lacquer primer, but NOT the other way around. Any sanding scratches from too coarse a grit when sanding undercoats will show up really severely through any final colour coats

-Lacquer from a spray can works fine, but it takes a lot of coats before you get the film build required to wet sand. It also dries very hard, making it somewhat more succeptible to chipping later in life and requires a very long cure time before sanding or compounding, or else continued shrinkage will make your finished project look bad.

-for opaque colors, the general order is:
-primer
-high build primer to fill any scratches or grain (wet sanded when cured)
-sealer (to preven the colour of the primer from bleeding through the final colour)
-final colour coat
-wet sanding, compounding and polishing

-The best primer is PPG DP40 (or DP74, there are several different DP primers, depending on colour desired. DP40 is greenish, there is an oxide red colour, and a black) epoxy primer, bar none. The best surfacer is PPG polyester surfacer (it doesn't shrink as it cures, meaning you can use it over coarse sanding scratches and sand it much sooner after application without worrying that it will shrink after the colour coat is on, telegraphing the sanding scratches through the colour). Follow with thinned DP40 for a sealer, then topcoat with Imron or PPG Concept, or even a spray can. DP40 is compatible with almost anything. The point is you have a stable, smooth undercoat with the steps I have mentioned.

I counseled someone against using a body shop to paint, but if you do a good undercoating job yourself and plan to wet sand and compound the final finish (no metallics - they can't be sanded), it's not a bad way to go if a) you supply the paint to the body shop or b) you tell them to use a standard colour (i.e. black)
#10
Thanks for the info. By the way from what i've heard and seen Krylon spraypaint is a BAD way to go. Check this out. You need to be a member of the site in order to see the pics, but if you're thinking of painting your guitar w/ Krylon I think it's worth it to see the damage that can happen over a short period of time.

http://www.frankenstraat.com/forums/viewtopic.php?p=6826&highlight=#6826

However if you want a relic style I suppose Krylon would be fine. But I just want you to know what could eventually happen.
DRAGONFORCE>EVERYTHING ELSE paste this into your sig if you like dragonfoce!

My Equipment:

Customized Fender Lead III (Mary-Lou)
Epiphone Firebird VII Red
Fender MIM Strat Midnight Blue
New Amp Soon
Johnson Flanger
Last edited by NamAim1991 at Feb 24, 2007,
#11
Quote by NamAim1991
Thanks for the info. By the way from what i've heard and seen Krylon spraypaint is a BAD way to go. Check this out. You need to be a member of the site in order to see the pics, but if you're thinking of painting your guitar w/ Krylon I think it's worth it to see the damage that can happen over a short period of time.

Please post the pics in PhotoBucket so we can see the damage. I've used Krylon and Duplicolor and so far, every paintjob I've done has held up well ... granted that I've only started since last Summer (2006).

I've been meticulous in my prep work and refinishing so my expectation is that it'll last for quite a bit. I know Crash Matto of the CrashoCaster fame used Krylon in 50 of his Custom Shop jobs for Fender (including the 3 he did for Clapton).

My last project on a personal guitar was mostly Krylon and I've probably done 15 or so other projects since then, using Krylon and Duplicolor. Vulcan sounds like a pro and he posts some useful tech info about paint so I'm paying attention.

#12
^ Just curious, if your spraying that many bodies why not invest in a some spray equipment. It would give you more options, can use a better finish and lay down a better finish.
#13
sorry to hi-jack the thread bt can u even get translusent paint in a spray can. For a translusent finish wont you need a dye to stain the body?
#14
Quote by dingo356
sorry to hi-jack the thread bt can u even get translusent paint in a spray can. For a translusent finish wont you need a dye to stain the body?



You can. The final effect is very much different from the dye/clearcoat method. Its like putting a coloured plastic bag over the wood. You can still see the grain of the wood, barely, but the colour is all on top of it. The dye method accentuates the grain if done correctly. If you use translucent red paint over, say white metallic, you end up with an interesting effect, like the 'candy apple red' of the 70s that everyone liked on their musclecar. The final colour in that case was translucent.
Last edited by Vulcan at Feb 24, 2007,
#15
Quote by dave293
^ Just curious, if your spraying that many bodies why not invest in a some spray equipment. It would give you more options, can use a better finish and lay down a better finish.

True and I agree with the ease of getting a quality finish. I have an inexpensive Paasche kit which I probably should use more except I'd need an assistant to do the set-up and clean-up. Kinda distracting when all you care about is paint, paint, paint, without sacrificing the quality of the final finish.

I've gotten so comfortable with spraycans, just like I often use a boxcutter for cutiing masks instead of the cutting blades with the proper handles. I'm interested in an Iwata gravity-fed kit except I'm suspecting it'll just get parked like the Paasche kit. I'm doing all of this for fun anyway; even though the occasional few $$$ help with buying more guitars and gear. Personal preference and all that.

#16
Yeah, as has been said before, spray cans will work just fine. As long as you're careful and don't rush (though some people **Ippon** can do amazing paintjobs in a week..) spraycans like Krylon will give you a pretty quality finish. You can get them pretty much anywhere. Just be sure to do a really thourough sanding between coats, and use a primer and some sort of sealer. Krylon and Duplicolour both make a laquer based clear coat I believe. Sand out ANY imperfections in the paint before you put the top coat on though. Lastly, give yourself time to do it if you're inexperienced. I'm working on a strat project in the middle of second semester while living on campus about 300 miles from home...lol...it's fun but pretty crazy.
There's a billion threads about painting and refinishing from people who know tons about modding, so just take a look around the forum. What you choose to paint yer guitar with basically comes down to what kind of finish you want and how much you can spend on the process.
#18
Sorry it took so long for me to post pictures. A guy over at Frankenstraat.com used Krylon to paint one of his guitars. It looked really great at first, but after a few months the paint started to crack... he checked to see if he had done anything wrong but apparently it was just the paint. There are others that I've heard talk about having the same results with Krylon. Here are some pics...

Before:




After:






That should give you an idea of the dammage that can be done. But I guess if you wanted to do something that looks aged, then spray paint would be fine, but if you wanted to do something that'll last, then i'd say go with a more professional approach.
DRAGONFORCE>EVERYTHING ELSE paste this into your sig if you like dragonfoce!

My Equipment:

Customized Fender Lead III (Mary-Lou)
Epiphone Firebird VII Red
Fender MIM Strat Midnight Blue
New Amp Soon
Johnson Flanger
Last edited by NamAim1991 at Mar 4, 2007,