#1
as a player, i'm pretty decent, i'm almost complete the solo in Tornado of Souls, and am starting Hangar 18 next.

I've been playing for like 4 years (Last Six months i got serious) and i still can't tune my guitar by ear perfectly, let alone transcribe a song.

Help?
Member of the "Marty Friedman > You" Club. PM apocalypse13 or altronataku to join

Gear:

ESP LTD DV8-R
Squier SG (Specs Unknown)
Kustom KGA-10 Ten watt practice amp
Marshall TSL 602

My JEM Build
#3
take theory in school. if not, take a couple singing lessons. trust me, when you sing something and learn how to do it the correct way, it makes hearing it easier. it works for me at least.
#4
Quote by omgnowaii
take theory in school. if not, take a couple singing lessons. trust me, when you sing something and learn how to do it the correct way, it makes hearing it easier. it works for me at least.


Singing has helped me. In particular, being able to recognize relative intervals, and singing them has helped me a lot.

This makes the process a bit easier. You hear a note, and once you've found the note, you can say, "Well, the next note is a fourth up, so I know it's this note. And the next is a minor third down..." Chord recognition is also very helpful, and if you know some common progressions you might be able to recognize the chords right off the bat (though you might not know every voice).


The way I've learned this is in class. If you can find a good teacher, it would help out a lot, but if not, try using the ear trainers in the link backtothe70s posted.
(Slightly outdated) Electronic and classical compositions by m'self: Check 'em out
#5
oh i'm not bad at theory, i can construct major and minor scales, and i can read music.

i just suck at deciphering notes. How do i improve? Intervals we do in school, but we only ever learnt it in the c position for piano...

i'll endeavor, and ask my music teach at school about them
singing is probably a bad idea right now, seeing as my voice is kinda cracking...

i've always wanted to though.. should i wait for puberty to leave my voice alone? (lol?)

So intervals help, what else helps?

EDIT my eventual goal is to be able to recognize notes upon hearing them (ie someone plays a D#, i say "you just played a D#!!!" but i realize that's a long way away.
Member of the "Marty Friedman > You" Club. PM apocalypse13 or altronataku to join

Gear:

ESP LTD DV8-R
Squier SG (Specs Unknown)
Kustom KGA-10 Ten watt practice amp
Marshall TSL 602

My JEM Build
Last edited by seek_&_destroy at Feb 24, 2007,
#6
its EXTREMELY hard to just recognize a note when someone plays it...ive played piano for about 6 years, i can't even try to do that. i actually think there are very few people who can, you have to have a really good ear. dont feel bad if you cant do it.

worth a try though, youre gonna hafta work hard. god speed.
#7
Personally, I think it's all about experience.
I have been playing for 9 years (actually only the 5 last count) and I can play any note I want to hear next to what I've just played without having to play everything until I find the right one. And I haven't taken any lessons at all, that may have helped.

You just have to patient, practice a lot and you'll get a lot better in everything. In a few years everything will come very naturally to you. The real challenge is figure out the small details and tricks that many use guitarists just by ear.
Last edited by DarKMaTTeR.tm at Feb 25, 2007,
#8
Quote by omgnowaii
its EXTREMELY hard to just recognize a note when someone plays it...ive played piano for about 6 years, i can't even try to do that. i actually think there are very few people who can, you have to have a really good ear. dont feel bad if you cant do it.

worth a try though, youre gonna hafta work hard. god speed.



You will never be able to do it unless you have perfect pitch.