#1
Ok im buying an AC30 and i want a nce OD pedal to go with it.....i tried a TS9 in the shop and thought it sounded sweet although not very versatile...i've heard good things about the Bad Monkey and i was wondering which would be better...or any other suggestions
MIA Fender Strat
Yamaha FG-450S
Crafter 12 string
Orange Rocker 30 combo
Vox AC30CC2
Epi Valve Junior
Fulltone Clyde
Danelectro Free Speech
T.C. Electronic Vintage Dual Distortion
Boss MIJ GE-7 (c1987)
Boss TU2
MXR Phase 90
Artec delay
#2
i really liked the bad monkey, it was really smooth and has nice crunch, but the tube screamer is pretty good too. personally i'd go with the bad monkey.
#4
i havent tried the tubescreamer althugh i have very good things about it. but i own the bad monkey and it is amazing. i cant get screaming amounts of distortion out of it but that could be doen to my guitar being very old and pretty ****ed up. it sounds amazing for the stuff i play like hendrix or vai all the way to cheesy socal punk like the offspring

i play a columbus 70s les paul copy with piss weak pickups
and my amp is 70s peavey hr 15 watt

so if it can sound great through that crap then i'd wholeheartedly recommend the bad monkey
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#5
The Bad Monkey is just a tubescreamer clone. If the Tubescreamer didn't scratch your itch, chances are the Bad Monkey isn't going to either.
#8
Would the bad monkey coupled with the AC30's overdrive be able to get a good crunch sound?
MIA Fender Strat
Yamaha FG-450S
Crafter 12 string
Orange Rocker 30 combo
Vox AC30CC2
Epi Valve Junior
Fulltone Clyde
Danelectro Free Speech
T.C. Electronic Vintage Dual Distortion
Boss MIJ GE-7 (c1987)
Boss TU2
MXR Phase 90
Artec delay
#9
^I'd prefer a treble booster over a tubescreamer type box on a Vox AC. One of the guys on the forum here sells them for cheap.
#10
i wouldn't be able to tell you how it sounds with that amp, because im not really a vox fan. but jekyll & hyde usually sound good with most amps.
#12
BUILD QUALITY
This is the first shipment of Jekylls to reach these shores, courtesy of UK distributor Barnes and Mullins. Graham Stockley from B&M explained how, at January's NAMM show in LA, the company's buyers were so "blown away by the Visual Sound Ultimate Overdrives's looks that they ordered a batch of them on the strength of its wicked appearance alone".
So let's heave open that creaky old door, move cautiously through the half-light of the lab and blow the dust from the Ultimate Overdrive. (In the voice of Vincent Price): only then will we discover the true horror that dwells therein. Ah hah hah haaaahh!
The sheet-steel casing leaves no doubts as to the unit's structural integrity. We are definitely talking 'built to last' here. A pair of chrome footswitches handles the channel switching and are just as sturdy as the large LED status indicators; a green one for Jekyll and an appropriately red one for the Hyde channel. Input is to the right of the unit with output on the left and, apart from the power supply input on the rear panel, that's your lot for connections.

Designed to run off pretty much any negative polarity 9V DC [regulated] adapter, the Jekyll's manual lists Ibanez, Morley, BOSS, and Jim Dunlop as compatible examples. Or, if you prefer, there's the unique battery compartment on the underside; the door to which is held in place by just a single screw and swings out to reveal the battery. Controls are arranged logically enough, with the Jekyll channel's three simple knobs first in line. Drive, tone and volume are all you need to get tones from this channel. The Hyde channel on the other hand is a little more involved. It has drive, tone and volume too, but with the addition of a sharp/blunt switch for adjusting brightness, and an EQ knob for altering the midrange frequencies which is ideal for getting those 'scooped-mid' sounds associated with James Hetfield's heavy tone.

FEATURES
The Jekyll and Hyde pedal is essentially 'two for the price of one'. Each half can work separately, providing you with 'blues' or 'bruise', or together to give you four different sounds at your feet. Choose between Jekyll, Hyde, bypass or Jekyll and Hyde together. This versatility is just one of the many features that make the Ultimate Overdrive stand out from the crowd.

SOUNDS
Overdrive sounds from the Jekyll channel alone are instantly pleasing. There's a sonic depth and smooth chocolate-coated sustain that's reminiscent of the original TS808 Tube Screamer. The way that the pedal interacts with the amp and is sensitive to playing dynamics is sheer magic. If you've got a valve combo that needs a kick up the rear-end, this is the pedal to administer it. Even in the high gain Hyde mode you can summon 'break up' sounds from the Ultimate Overdrive with the gain control set low. This gives a slightly more ballsy sound which makes whatever you play seem raw and dirty. In fact it's a bigger sound altogether, similar to that of a closed back 4x12" cabinet with all the characteristic 'whoomph!'.

Any amount of classic amp sounds - from a combo to a stack - are available from the Hyde channel, with plenty of tonal variations too. There's gain in abundance, so even the nastiest noisemonger can glean satisfaction. The instruction manual contains several example settings for you to try out, with titles like 'Metal Madness' and 'Neck Pickup Blues'. I must admit that these descriptions are quite accurate and the examples provide an excellent starting point for tailoring your own sounds. I particularly liked the 'Big Fat Blues' setting which involves judicious use of the Hyde channel's gain, with a small helping of EQ.

The fun really begins when you blend the two channels together -- how about screaming lead, bristling with harmonics and big, fat, bottom-end. Great for Jeff Beck solos where you need lengthy sustain and sweet saturated notes. Alternatively, you could simply use the Hyde channed as a volume and/or mid boost to add balls to the Jekyll channed for lead breaks and solos.

Only with all knobs on ten did things get out of hand -- instant feedbacking and ugly distortion. Come to think of it, a lot of modern bands would probably use that sound too.

^^^^^^
got this from a site
#14
Fulltone Full-drive 2.

It is a (improved) TS-808 copy with an additional switch for boost.

Go try it out.