#1
Hey everybody,

I'm fairly new at the bass. I got one about 5 or 6 months ago and like to play around with when I can. Unfortunately, school keeps me busy so I don't play as much as I would like too.

Anyways, I was wondering if there is a way to transcribe guitar chords into a single equivalent note or adjust it so I can play a version of it on my bass. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks.
#2
First, wanna be a good Bassist?
Learn theory, now!

And to get you started, a chord is basiclly the first, third, and fifth grades in a scale (hopefully you know scales).
This goes the same in Minors.
Or if you want to '"remember it by numbers" then
Major: Root - 4 semi tones - 3 semi tones
Minor: Root - 3 semi tones - 4 semi tones

Those are the basic ones, post here if you need anymore.
For long you live and high you fly
But only if you ride the tide
And balanced on the biggest wave
You race toward an early grave.


Ben Hamelech
#4
Heh, I know some theory. I've been playing the violin since third grade, so of course I know scales . Although, I guess the closest thing violinist have to chords are double or triple stops.

Take for instance, a G chord (http://www.chordfind.com/).
Is the root note G? Would I get a similar sound if I just played a G note on my bass?
#5
Yes, the root note on a G Major chord is G

So four half steps from a G is a B, and three half steps from B is a D
And, Voila a G Major chord.

But doing it by scales is easier.
For long you live and high you fly
But only if you ride the tide
And balanced on the biggest wave
You race toward an early grave.


Ben Hamelech
#6
Yes the root is G. You can either play straight eigth notes of G to make it easy.

Or (assuming you can do the 1 and 2 and etc. count) you can make the first two notes (or 1 and) the root, G. Then the next two be the third B (two and), then the next two be the fifth D (three and), then the last two BG or something (four and) whatever you want. A simple groove but sounds fun.

If you need more of an explanation just PM me (or if you want to join my club hehehe)
#7
The "root note" is basically the note that's at the bottom of the chord - the "root" of the chord. Alternatively, for a G chord, the root is G, an E chord, E and so on.

It will not only be a similar sound, but the same note as the root (assuming you're in tune :p). However, you obviously won't get the sound of a full chord being played.