#1
I bought some picks today and I usually only play with hard ones but I made a mistake and bought some .46mm ones by accident. So I was just wondering, does anyone really use these? What are they good for (stylewise)? How are they better or worse than thick picks? I usually use around 1mm.
#2
well light picks are rele bad to be honest. u cant like solo and u can barely they break on me while i play. wen u go to get more picks get 1.0mm. good for strumming and great for cross picking and stuff like tht.
esp ltd m300
ibanez rg
jackosn dinky strat

digitech rp155l
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carvin mt3200 tube amp


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#4
I like .8 dunlop tortex I pretty picky about witch picks I get. Ha Ha get it picky about picks. Stupid Joke.
#5
I use the thinnest picks of anyone I know at 0.6mm which I find slightly too thin but the next one up is way too thick so God knows how many people actually use 0.46mm!
#6
.60 nylon is as thin as I go really, and I only use that for a few odd things. Useful to have though.
#7
well personally i like to use lighter picks on my acoustic if playing a slow song that mostly consist of chords
#9
I use these

http://www.bigcitystring.com/pj3.htm

I use the XLs. They are 1.38mm. Its pretty thick but the sharp point helps ease through the strings while strumming. I can also solo with them. THe sharp point also helps with Pick Squeels. I love them.
My Gear:
Gibson SG special (W/ S.D. Jazz(N) & JB (B))
Mesa-Boogie Solo Triple Rec. (with EL-34's)
Boss DD-6 Digital Delay
Boss TU-2 Chromatic tuner
(what else do i need)

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#11
i can't use anything less than 1mm when im playing electric. With acoustic strumming i can make an exception. But for any type of fast playing, anything less than 1mm has too much give. I normally use 1.38mm Jazz IIIs
GEAR

Epiphone Elitist Les Paul Standard Plus
Marshall JCM 800 half stack
#12
Green Dunlop Tortex - .88mm I belive, The best!
Peavey JSX 2x12
ESP Horizon NT-II
Ibz RG3EXQM - EMG 81/89
Ibz RG270 - Dimarzio PAF Pro/Mo' Joe
Dunlop Crybaby
Ibanez DE-7
EHX Small Clone
Boss NS-2
#13
A family memeber of mine that plays uses the .46 and he's a GREAT blues guitarist. He solos with them.
#14
I use .88's I think. I honestly think it's just your own preference...the thicker picks for me give me more umph and tone to my chords and solo-ing...but for thinner picks, it's just easier to pick faster.
Co-Founder of the Orange Revolution Club


-Esp/Ltd Ec-1000 w/ BKP Mules
-2-channel Titan
-Oversized Bogner 2x12 Cabinet
-Fulltone OCD
-RMC Picture Wah
-T.C. Electronic Nova Delay
-Larrivee D-03R
#15
I use 1.0, I can't stand playing with anything thinner then 1.mm. When I use some of my dads acoustics i use thin ones, they give a good sound for chords
"See, you're born punk. When you get your first haircut, then you're alternative. Then you let it grow long, then you're metal." - Kirk Hammett
#17
I use Clayton Black Jazz 1.90mms and Big Stubbies that are 3.0mm. Anything under 1.5mm I can't use for bluesy/jazzy/shreddy stuff.

Thicker = better

Except for chording/strumming when I use a .73mm Tortex pick.

Thick = riffing, shredding
Thin = chording, strumming
#18
I use Dunlop Gator 1.5 mm. Everything else is too thin, or too thick for me.
Basses
Ibanez Gio GSR100 w/ SDs

Amps
Acoustic B200
#19
I use 0.96mm dunlop ones with the turtle on em. I dont really like using anything thicker than that for electric, or anything thinner.
#20
I use from .88 to .5 depending on my mood, or what was closer to me or shiniest when I reach for one. For bass, I can't use less than 1.0 or it drives me crazy. For guitar I can't use 1.0 or higher because it drives me crazy and breaks my strings.
Telecaster - SG - Jaguar
Princeton Reverb, Extra Reverb
P-Bass - Mustang Bass
Apogee Duet 2 - Ableton Suite
#21
LIGHT picks are good for LIGHT strumming. If you're just chillin' out with some jazz chords they're good.

If you're not playing that type stuff then stick with heavy in my opinion.
Gear:
Washburn X10
Yamaha EG 112
Crate VTX30
Yamaha GA-10