#1
Hey guys, I was wondering if i could have your opinions on the Vox Valvetronix, since i am planning on purchasing the 30 watt version. I know its a hybrid , and i want to know how that affects its overrall tone, i also want to know what type of music its good for and just pretty much anything else you want to tell me about it , oh yea and about its features. thanks..
#2
does ervy type of style. cant do metal on its own. need a booster pedal for that. great cleans and effects. great amp really.
1993 Jackson Dinky Professional XL (shred)
Modified Squier Strat (blues and anything)
Vox Valvetronix AD30VT
Boss DS-1 Distortion
Dunlop Original Crybaby GCB-95
#3
Thanks for the info. its all right i dont really do to much metal anyways.
#5
I have the 50 watt version and I really like it. Some people say that the effects sound too digital, but I think they sound fine. It can't handle anything too heavy without effects pedals for distortion, but for blues and clean it's fine.
#7
I don't like them. I have no experience with the 15, but I've owned the 30 for over a year and have spent a good amount of time with both the 50 and 100. The 30 has a crappy speaker. The 50 and 100 have "special Celestion" speakers but suffer from way too much bass. When you try to back off the bass, it gets thin. The problem with the Valvetronix amps is that they try to be "authentic," so all the EQ controls don't work in most models. They're annoying to use and sound bland after a while.
Hi, I'm Peter
#8
I have the 60 watt AD60VTX Valvetronix, and I love it. I'm not sure how close it is to the 30 watt in terms of design, but here is what I think of the 60. If it's at all similar, maybe it'll help.

It models enough different amps that you could come out with most any tone you want. I use the AC30 model the most. It's perfect for late 60s rock, as bands like The Beatles used AC30s and the like. The Boutique Clean or Tweed 4x12 are good for cleans, good RHCP tones. The UK Blues is good for just that. The Tweed and the Black model can be tweaked for a country/rockabilly sound. The US High Gain and Recto models are good for heavy distortion.

The pedal simulations seem good, though I don't have much experience with real pedals. I'm not a big fan of the auto-wah, but I've a real wah (also a Vox, the V847, which I'd also recommend.) The acoustic pedal give a reasonable imitation of an acoustic, especially with the Tweed or Boutique Clean models. The acoustic pedal combined with the Recto model with high gain gives a tone identical to the high guitar in Cream's "Swlabr."

I'm not really big into effects or reverb, but they're good and there's enough variety that you'll be able to find what you want.

The preset programs are good, but the descriptions in the manual are misleading. They sound good, but not like what they say they are. I'd recommend playing with the settings and finding the tones you like on your own. (Hey, fiddling with it is half the fun.)

The 60 watt has a power regulator so you can play at 60, 30, 15, or 1 watt(s). I don't know if the 30 watt has that, but it's a nice feature.

This is a great amp. Go for it.
Can't stop the signal.
#9
^ The 60 is nothing like the 30. It has more models, more effects, more features, and retails for 3x the price of the 30. Those cloth grille AD series amps (namely the 60 and 120) are much better than the metal grille AD series amps.
Hi, I'm Peter
#10
I have the 30 with a Celestion G10 Vintage speaker installed. I find that it sounds much better when its master volume is cranked up (ignore that stupid knob on the back, leave that on full all the time).

Once you add a bit of volume it does metal on its own easily. However at really low volumes it needs a boost to tighten up the low end.

They are great amps for the money, of course there are better amps out there but the Valvetronix give you a decent sound at a very resonable price.