#2
I think it's when the action is lower at the nut (good for chording).

Quote by emad
jthm_guitarist
Warned for trolling!


Quote by metal4eva_22
Didn't you say that you had a stuffed fox that you would occasionally fuck?

Quote by Axelfox
It's not a fox,it's a wolf.
#3
When you fret a note on a nonscalloped fretboard the string touches the fretboard (sometimes) and creates some resistance, dampening some noise. Now this doesn't matter if you pick every note but you legato (hammer-on and pull-offs) will generally be quieter because of the string hitting the wood. On a scalloped one the string only hits the fret and creates as much vibration as possible, making legato easier. The disadvantage is it's less comfortable for some, and feels weird, especially after playing years on a nonscalloped fretboard. Also I have heard bending is harder, sounds worse, on a scalloped fretboard, though I have never used one.
Yeah Dimebag is not the "Greatest Guitarist" of all time... Hendrix maybe... I must go get food to eat with my mouth

$250 for an amp? wow. is it worth it to invest that much in the amp?

#4
Quote by jthm_guitarist
I think it's when the action is lower at the nut (good for chording).


What? No, that's just low action. It sounds like you're confusing fretboard radius with scalloped.
Yeah Dimebag is not the "Greatest Guitarist" of all time... Hendrix maybe... I must go get food to eat with my mouth

$250 for an amp? wow. is it worth it to invest that much in the amp?

#6
Quote by RPotts
Also I have heard bending is harder, sounds worse, on a scalloped fretboard, though I have never used one.

Well, you're almost right, but it's the other way around. I own an Yngwie Malmsteen Strat, by the way.

Scalloping the fretboard makes it easier to bend, at the expense of worrying about intonation, that is, you can't press down to hard on the strings or the note will go out of tune. It does, however, make chording harder.

Scalloped fretboards are traditionally associated with shredders (no doubt because of Malmsteen), but the greatest advantage of scalloped fretboards are, as I said earlier, easier bends and vibrato, and it may actually hamper your ability to play fast, depending on how hard you press the strings. If you have a light touch like me, you'll be fine.

Also, it has nothing to do with string dampening.
#7
As Jongpil Yun said, it makes bending and vibrato easier and if you press on the strings too hard, the note will sound sharp. This is also the case with guitars with very large frets.
Please vote for my band in a demo competition by clicking
here, pressing the button that says "Gi din stemme" and then connecting to facebook! Thanks a lot!
#8
It gives you much more control over your bending and vibrato

It forces you to play cleaner because misfretted notes tend to not ring out at all

The tone is a little clearer as a result of the string not contacting the fretboard


But you have to be very careful with intonation
#9
I don't think I've ever seen a scalloped fretboard. Don't suppose someone has a picture of one?
~We Rock Out With Our Cocks Out!: UG Naked Club.~
Once in a blue moon, God reaches down from his lofty perch, points at an infant boy and proclaims, "This one shall have balls carved out of fucking granite."
#11
Quote by MetalUpTheAss
It forces you to use a lighter touch, which helps in speedy runs.


No. Playing fast becomes harder, but in exchange you get more control over vibrato and bends.
#12
If you played cleanly before, it won't be harder. But if you were getting away with mistakes, you won't find a scalloped board to be so forgiving.
#13
Extract taken from the Ritchie Blackmore official wiki, source http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ritchie_Blackmore

With Deep Purple and Rainbow, Blackmore almost exclusively played a Fender Stratocaster. He is also one of the first guitarists to use a "scalloped" fretboard where the wood is shaved down between the frets. It requires the player to play with a lighter touch as pressing hard will cause the note to sound sharp. The result is increased control of vibrato and bending at the cost of making chordal playing more difficult. Other scalloped neck users include John McLaughlin, Yngwie J. Malmsteen, Uli Jon Roth, and also Steve Vai, whose signature Ibanez is scalloped above the 20th fret.
#14
Also with the scalloped board your bending ability is not limited by your action (assuming you don't have a ridiculously radiused board)

So you can have nice fast low action and still get crankin bends
#15
I've noticed that accuracy and articulation is an advantage. Your fingers can "lock" into a position and you feel the frets rolling under your fingers so you can more accurately feel where you are on the neck, esp. when sliding between positions.

Less chance of finger fretting on the fret because you either feel just string or a fret, if that makes sense.
#16
Quote by LonesomeCrow
I've noticed that accuracy and articulation is an advantage. Your fingers can "lock" into a position and you feel the frets rolling under your fingers so you can more accurately feel where you are on the neck, esp. when sliding between positions.

Less chance of finger fretting on the fret because you either feel just string or a fret, if that makes sense.


Just so you know you bumped a year and a half old thread
Gear
Jackson Dinky DKMGT Transparent Black
#17
It just allows for more wild vibrato, really. Most other things you hear is pretty much a myth. The fretboards of some ancient classical instruments are scalloped, and this is where the practice came from. It was done to allow easier vibrato. It certainly does "feel different", which can make it difficult to play at first, but that's only a matter of spending time with a scalloped guitar.

Quote by RPotts
Also I have heard bending is harder, sounds worse, on a scalloped fretboard, though I have never used one.


That's not true, and furthermore, makes absolutely no sense (not that the way you wrote it makes no sense, but rather that bending would be harder and/or sounds worse on a scalloped fretboard).