#1
Right todayfor some reason when i plug my guitar in, and touch my elbow to my guitar bridge i get a shock.... wel not just my elbow obviously but you know what i mean.. When i unplug it i dont get the same problem. What the hell is going on. I did have a heavy night last night with people around but no drink went over my stack or anything.

The only thing i can think of is maybe the power supply for my wah and pedals is sum how getting through to the metal hardware on my guitar?

Has anyone experienced this before? Is there anyway i can stop it, because i cant play comfortably anymore without getting a shock everytime i happy to touch the bridge. For some reasons the strings are fine.

Thanks in advance.
#3
Quote by splinter26
The only thing i can think of is maybe the power supply for my wah and pedals is sum how getting through to the metal hardware on my guitar?
Thanks in advance.


It probably has nothing to do with that. Im guessing it's either just some annoying static that comes by now and again, or if it keeps happening, unscrew the back and see if everything looks right, because if it was an electrical problem, it'd look pretty obvious even to an untrained eye.
My Gear:

Guitars:
Fender American HSS Stratocaster

Amps & Effects:
Hand-Wired JCM 800 2204
Hand-Wired V30 2x12 Cab
Keeley TS-9 Tube Screamer
ISP Decimator
EHX Holiest Grail
Modded Dunlop Crybaby
Boss RC-2 Loop Station
#4
Mmm never happened to me though, I play bass and electric guitar..
But sometimes when I'm playing the amp sounds like shit

I bet my amp is too old for me
#5
I'm guessing it's a ground problem on your guitar. Normally, that voltage should be shorted to the ground on your guitar and sent to earth. It means that the grounding has come loose in your guitar, and somewhere in your amp/effects the live wire has got into the signal path, and so making your guitar shock you. This is what I presume it is anyway, and I doubt it is your amp, cause you'd DEFINATELY know about it what with the voltages involved, even more so if it's a valve amp.
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#6
Winter? The dryness causes static electricity and I'm guessing your bridge is made of metal and therefore conducted the static...I payed attention in science class today.
#7
cheers for your replies Calum Barrow, sound like your probably right.

Its definetly not static its re occuring . every time i touch it.

I've recently had new Pick Ups installed but untill now had no problems with it. The jack socket does appear slightly lose could that be to do with it? Before i go and take everything apart.
#8
it definitely sounds like grounding. make sure that the wire attaching the ground to the output jack is soldered and connected right.

and a question i've always wondered- where do all the ground signals end up?
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#9
^ They go back down the guitar cable and into the ground.
Double Neck Project - Winner of 2006 GB&C "Best guitar build from scratch", "(Best) Most expensive build" and "Best Idea" awards - FINISHED!

Member #2 of the UG Luthier's club. PM AlGeeEater to join.
#10
Our bassist had the same problem with his bass. He dropped it once because of a cheap strap, and when he took it to a guitar repairist, no problem. It was something to do with the grounding, like people said
#11
Ah great, thanks for the help guys. i'll have to go get it repaired then. As i wouldnt know what to do. Untill then i'll have to wear a hoody when playing lol
#12
its probably not grounded well.
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