#1
I'm a beginner at guitar player, and have been playing lead guitar parts until now, barely looking at chords. Now, I looked at the chord progression for a song which includes GV and DV chords. I could not find these anywhere, could anyone explain what they are? Thanks.
#3
G5. V is a roman numeral for 5. its a powerchord
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#5
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#6
Thats a powerchord. Also known as a fifth.
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#10
Makes sense. But that cant be it.

Why not? You're not in the Vajor camp are you?

It's powerchord, when we talk about chord progressions we often use roman numerals, same goes for scales so it's just referring to the 5th as in root and 5th as in powerchord.
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#11
It's either a power chord or the 5th chord in a given scale/key/progression. The V is roman ( I think) for 5.
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#12
^What Muppet said.
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#13
so check it, a power chord includes both a fifth and an octave, which is why it is so adaptable as it is neither major or minor really. But when written GV or G5, that implies only the fifth, what about the 8th of the octave? this is why sheet music written on staffs will always be superior!!!
#14
The octave is the same note as the root. It doesn't matter if you play it, because hte tonality is still the same.
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#15
+1 for Vajor
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