#1
Hey, When people say "Oh it look's like he just added a 5th" does that mean, whatever chord they were playing they counted up 5 note's from the last note in the chord?

Example:

G Chord:
E. 3
B. 0
G. 0
D. 0
A. 2
E. 3

the last note on that chord is 3rd fret which is a G. to add a 5th to this chord do I count five notes up from G wich would be a C?

I'm really stumped on this!
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#2
adding a 5th is just a powerchord. You take a note, add the 5th, and whammo.
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#3
A Major 'G' Chord is made up a 1st 3rd an 5th
1st Being G the Root note
3rd Being B the Third note
5th Being D the Fifth note

The Chord you have shone already has a fifth.
The Open D string.
To Add a Fifth you put in another D.
I'm not sure you might make the D that you just added it's root note.
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#4
812many
adding a 5th is just a powerchord. You take a note, add the 5th, and whammo.


Can you give me a example?

or let me take a crack it this, if i do a G powerchord, the fith of the would be C? im really confused, and you didnt fully explain yourself..
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#6
sumfears


thanks, what about the in betweens? 2nds n 4ths? do those exist? ahah.

also can 5ths be added to other stuff besides chords?
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#7
C isn't a fifth to G. it's not five frets, it's the fifth note of the scale - G/1 A/2 B/3 C/4 D/5 so D is the fifth.
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#8
Yeah... it has to do with the major scale. Take a root note (say C), your 2nd is D, 3rd - E, 4th - F, 5th - G, 6th - A, 7th - B, octave - C. Power chord = root + 5th +(octave, if you want).

Other examples - D power chord - Root - D, 5th - A
Eb - Root - Eb, 5th - Bb
E - Root - E, 5th - B

A major chord includes the 3rd. A minor includes the minor 3rd (which is one half step below the major 3rd).
Hopefully, you get the idea...
#9
Quote by kyucide
C isn't a fifth to G. it's not five frets, it's the fifth note of the scale - G/1 A/2 B/3 C/4 D/5 so D is the fifth.


Frets have nothing to do with intervals.

Count five letter names up from G:

G A B C D

You will know if it is D natural, D sharp, or D flat depending on the key signature. In G, there is only one sharp, and that is F. So we know D natural s a perfect fifth from G.
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#10
Quote by brandenetc


Can you give me a example?

or let me take a crack it this, if i do a G powerchord, the fith of the would be C? im really confused, and you didnt fully explain yourself..


You can really add a fifth anywhere to a root-fifth power chord. Say you play on the 5th fret of the E(low) string. Add the 5th (2 frets up, on the next string), which would be the 7th fret on the A string, in this case. Therefore, you have the root note, and the fifth (hence "root fifth"). People call these power chords. Learn more here, in case my explanation made no sense whatsoever.

http://www.cyberfret.com/chords/power/index.php
#11
Quote by brandenetc
thanks, what about the in betweens? 2nds n 4ths? do those exist? ahah.

also can 5ths be added to other stuff besides chords?


As for 2nds and 4ths, there are tons of different types of chords that include these notes of a scale. Here's a good webpage that might better illustrate all of this:

http://www.gootar.com/theory.htm

The only other application of those terms that I can think of outside of chords would be intervals of consecutive notes, for instance, playing a C followed by a G would be going up from the root of a scale to the 5th.