#1
i have yet another question,

how do you memorize your scales? Like now, i'm trying to memorize minor pentatonic sclaes and all i do i play them over and over and it does'nt help. what did you guys do?

Should i memorize the box forms, and then find out what keys to play in somehow, i'm sorta lost.
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#2
I just.. read them, play them and remember..
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#3
practice 15 minutes a day and do it over and over. If u are new, its reasonably difficult for you to memorize. The best way to do it is to close your eyes and play, this way u use your feeling then your eyes. Practice at a variable speed and remember to be patient
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#4
There's only one pattern - the fingering alters depending on which strings you use but the notes you're playing in relation to each other are always the same. A minor pentatonic is the same as G minor pentatonic is the same as Bb minor pentatonic etc etc....all you're doing is changing the root note so you shift to the relevant position, but basically you can play the scale pattern from any instance of the root note.

The minor pentaonic scale is 5 notes, that's all. The box pattern you'll be trying to learn consists of the root, minor 3rd, 4th, 5th and 7th notes of the major scale. The 6th note you play in that box pattern is the next octave of the root note, so you're just repeating that same pattern again. All you do is start on a different root note to change the key eg 5th fret on low E for A minor pentatonic, 3rd fret for G minor pentatonic.
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Last edited by steven seagull at Mar 4, 2007,
#5
Practice them...
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#6
Another question if i memorize the notes on the fretboard how do i use that?
"You know honestly, i don't see myself getting any faster. I mean, you can only hear so much."
-Eddie Van Halen
#7
Quote by t-r-a-v-i-s
Another question if i memorize the notes on the fretboard how do i use that?

Learn the fretboard...then go more indepth into theory...possibilities are endless with music theory.
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#8
Another question if i memorize the notes on the fretboard how do i use that?

Reading what i posted would be as good a place as any to start...
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#9
By memorizing the notes on the fretboard, your general musical knowledge will grow very quickly. You will understand theory much easier if you know what notes you are playing. It also helps in reading music and building scales, if you would like examples, ask.

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#10
please
"You know honestly, i don't see myself getting any faster. I mean, you can only hear so much."
-Eddie Van Halen
#11
Quote by t-r-a-v-i-s
please


1) Learn all the notes on the fretboard
2) Learn the Cmaj scale.
3) Learn how to spell xxx scale intervallically
4) ???
5) Profit!
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#12
i set up rules and watch patterns for each scales, though I don't think this method will work for everyone. for example a major scale pattern goes 2-1-2-1-1-2, root note always has another note next to it...then skip one fret...then two note next to each other...etc, confusing but if you play it you'll see what I mean. Like it said, it doesn't work for everyone, find the best method for yourself.
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#13
Quote by steven seagull
There's only one pattern - the fingering alters depending on which strings you use but the notes you're playing in relation to each other are always the same. A minor pentatonic is the same as G minor pentatonic is the same as Bb minor pentatonic etc etc....all you're doing is changing the root note so you shift to the relevant position, but basically you can play the scale pattern from any instance of the root note.

The minor pentaonic scale is 5 notes, that's all. The box pattern you'll be trying to learn consists of the root, minor 3rd, 4th, 5th and 7th notes of the major scale. The 6th note you play in that box pattern is the next octave of the root note, so you're just repeating that same pattern again. All you do is start on a different root note to change the key eg 5th fret on low E for A minor pentatonic, 3rd fret for G minor pentatonic.


wait, then how can the 3 fret be the start of the first box, like

e-|--|--|3-|--|5-|--
B-|--|--|3-|--|5-|--
G-|--|2-|--|--|5-|--
D-|--|2-|--|--|5-|--
A-|--|--|3-|--|5-|--
E-|--|--|3-|--|5-|--

and be in A minor still because it looks like the root is G
"You know honestly, i don't see myself getting any faster. I mean, you can only hear so much."
-Eddie Van Halen
#14
Pretty much what everyone else has said, i pay attention to the theory behind the scales which is very useful when soloing and doing improvs.
#15
ya, I have been wondering about scales and the different box forms myself. Its all just a bit confusing. I do know all the notes on the fretboard. So, say I know 1 box form for a major scale. Since that box form is movable, I can use it all across the fretboard right. Ex. G major become G#/Afalt by moving up one fret right?
#16
wait, then how can the 3 fret be the start of the first box, like

e-|--|--|[color="Cyan"]3[/COLOR]-|--|5-|--
B-|--|--|[color="Magenta"]3[/COLOR]-|--|5-|--
G-|--|[color="Blue"]2[/COLOR]-|--|--|5-|--
D-|--|[color="Green"]2[/COLOR]-|--|--|5-|--
A-|--|--|[color="Red"]3[/COLOR]-|--|5-|--
E-|--|--|3-|--|5-|--

and be in A minor still because it looks like the root is G


Because that shape is exactly the same notes as the pattern below, save for the G which is simply the next note down in the scale. That's why learning it as different boxes isn't all that helpful...just learn the main one and figure out where else you can play the notes. What I've done is colour code the notes so you can see which notes are the same, just in different positions.

          5th fret
e-|--|--|5-|--|--|8-
B-|--|--|5-|--|--|[color="Cyan"]8[/COLOR]-
G-|--|--|5-|--|[color="Magenta"]7[/COLOR]-|--
D-|--|--|5-|--|[color="Blue"]7[/COLOR]-|--
A-|--|--|5-|--|[color="Green"]7[/COLOR]-|--
E-|--|--|5-|--|--|[color="Red"]8[/COLOR]-


That's why it's important to learn what the notes on the fretboard are and where they are. Use the basic pattern as the guideline for which notes to play rather than just where to put your fingers. As long as you know which note to play it doesn't matter where you play it.

ya, I have been wondering about scales and the different box forms myself. Its all just a bit confusing. I do know all the notes on the fretboard. So, say I know 1 box form for a major scale. Since that box form is movable, I can use it all across the fretboard right. Ex. G major become G#/Afalt by moving up one fret right?

Exactly
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Last edited by steven seagull at Mar 8, 2007,