#1
ok im a noob, im self taught and im confused atm. i just have been searching aroudn sites for the answers to the following question but het so confused so please be patient. thanx!

What exactly is a power chord?
What are the nubers after a cord? ie A5, C5, D6, etc
what are pentatonics?
what are harmonics? natural?
and why does a G chord sound shit on electric with distoration?
Setup

Ibanez SZ320
Randall RD75
EHX METAL MUFF
Mesa boogie single recto series 2
Line 6 Toneport
Mesa boogie single recto series 1
Digitech GNX4
Last edited by gface at Mar 5, 2007,
#2
im not even gonna try
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Then, about two minutes later of just plowing, I can feel it coming. She's still moaning and rolling back, and then I pull out. I grab her by her hair, pull her head up, and yell out:
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#3
Quote by xblack_sabbathx
im not even gonna try

Then don't post...
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#4
Power Chord is basically first three notes of a bar chord which basically just eliminates the problem of minor/major chords. I dont know how better to explain. The 5 indicates that a chord is a power chord. Pentatonic is a scale consisting of only 5 notes. Natural harmonics are sound that happens if you lightly touch a string over 5th, 7th or 12th fret and hit the string. G chord sounds shit with distortion if its an open G chord because of open strings,i guess i have no explaination. My explainations may be poor or wrong but i tried to explain in simple terms. Correct me if im wrong.
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#5
ok thankyou ive been learning this:

E--------------------------------------------------0--1--3-----
B----------------------------------------0--1--3-----------
G--------------------------------0--2--------------------
D-----------------------0-2--3-----------------------------
A-------------0--2--3-----------------------------------
E--0--1--3----------------------------------------------

what is it? is it a scale? pentatonic?
Setup

Ibanez SZ320
Randall RD75
EHX METAL MUFF
Mesa boogie single recto series 2
Line 6 Toneport
Mesa boogie single recto series 1
Digitech GNX4
#6
^Looks like a phyrgian scale on A.

edit: aye, nvm. But it's a scale.
Co-Founder of the Orange Revolution Club


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#8
wow confusing lol, i hate this feeling that i get.. im so eger to learn, but i have no one to teach me, i get lessons but they move slowly and i just guess im getting ahead of myself, i dont mind theory, i jut dont know what to leanr, ohh well. thanx!
Setup

Ibanez SZ320
Randall RD75
EHX METAL MUFF
Mesa boogie single recto series 2
Line 6 Toneport
Mesa boogie single recto series 1
Digitech GNX4
#9
Right, lets take the C major scale (let's add that A minor is the 'relative minor' of C major, basically, start the scale on A instead, and it's a minor scale)

CDEFGABC etc....

C is the root note
D is the major second
Eb is the minor third
E is the major third
F is the perfect fourth
G is the perfect fifth
A is the sixth (can't remember what type)
Bb is the minor seventh
B is the major seventh
C is the root note

A power chord consists of only root notes and perfect fifths:

e|---
B|---
G|-5-
D|-5-
A|-3-
E|---

^ is a C power chord, it consists of the notes C, G, C


The numbers after the chord denote what type of chord it is, C5 is a fifth chord (or power chord)

There are many different chords with root note C, ie.

C(major) - C, E, G
Cminor - C, Eb, G (lowering the major 3rd by 1 semitone/fret, turns the major into a minor)
C5 - C, G, C
C(dominant)7 - C, E, G, Bb (root, major 3rd, perfect 5th, minor 7th)
Cmajor7 - C, E, G, B (root, major 3rd, perfect 5th, major 7th)
Cminor7 - C, Eb, G, Bb (root, minor 3rd, perfect 5th, minor 7th)


A pentatonic scale is a very commonly used scale in rock and metal music, it fits well over power chord progressions and as long as you are in the right key, will sound like it fits. Look up tabs in lessons on here, I'm not going to do one especially.


Natural Harmonics are what you get when you lightly place your finger above the 12th, 7th, or 5th frets of the guitar and pick the strings (do NOT fret the string)

Artificial Harmonics are harmonics that exist 12 frets down from any note you have fretted, ie. you fret 6, there will be a harmonic at fret 18 (there will also be harmonics at other places, however, they are trickier to get)

Pinch Harmonics tend to be quite tricky. You need to hold the pick in a certain way, and damp part of the string in a certain place, ask about these once you get better (no offence or anything, they are a bitch.)


To understand why a normal chord sounds crap with distortion, you need to know what distortion does. Imagine your note as a perfect sine wave (it's not, but just presume it is) now cut the ends off of every peak so that it's flat across, this is what distortion does, the reason that your regular chords sound bad, is because other harmonic notes are introduced by doing this, meaning that it will just sound like a mess. The only chords you can really use with distortion are ones that include only root notes and perfect fifths (power chords) or root notes and perfect fourths.

Hope this helps!
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#10
^ that took far too long to write...
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Electronics God of the Laney Cult

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Ibanez RG370DX
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Dunlop Crybaby
Boss CS-3
Ibanez TS9DX
#11
thankyou so much dude! i really appreciate it, sometimes i just dont know what im learning but u have helped so much CHEERS!
Setup

Ibanez SZ320
Randall RD75
EHX METAL MUFF
Mesa boogie single recto series 2
Line 6 Toneport
Mesa boogie single recto series 1
Digitech GNX4
#12
no problem, just pm me if you have any theory questions or anything
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God & Founder of UG Electronics


Electronics God of the Laney Cult

My Gear:

Ibanez RG370DX
Laney VC30-212
Dunlop Crybaby
Boss CS-3
Ibanez TS9DX
#13
E--------------------------------------------------0--1--3-----
B----------------------------------------0--1--3-----------
G--------------------------------0--2--------------------
D-----------------------0-2--3-----------------------------
A-------------0--2--3-----------------------------------
E--0--1--3----------------------------------------------

Looks like the Aeolian Scale. Then again, I'm self-taught, so I don't have much faith in my guitaring in these situations... =p Please don't beat me!!! *whimpers*
#14
I don't do scales and Theories... But I can help on the Harmonic Part. The term " Natural " harmonics is extremely wide. It can mean anything from rubbed notes to the feedback that a good amp will push after a while. Just have fun with it, man. Don't focus on details, Focus on having a great time with your gee-tah.
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#15
lol, don't worry, you're right
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Electronics God of the Laney Cult

My Gear:

Ibanez RG370DX
Laney VC30-212
Dunlop Crybaby
Boss CS-3
Ibanez TS9DX
#16
Could be any one of seven different modes, depending on which of those notes you started on
Quote by The devil at the crossroads
E|-------------------------------------------1--
B|-----------------------------------1--4--
G|-------------------------1-3-4--
D|------------------1-3----
A|--------1-2-3----
E|-1-4-----

Just move it around the fretboard
#17
E--------------------------------------------------0--1--3-----
B----------------------------------------0--1--3-----------
G--------------------------------0--2--------------------
D-----------------------0-2--3-----------------------------
A-------------0--2--3-----------------------------------
E--0--1--3----------------------------------------------
Is this not just a C Scale starting on the low E string? Perhaps you would call this the Aeolian mode?
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#18
Quote:
E--------------------------------------------------0--1--3-----
B----------------------------------------0--1--3-----------
G--------------------------------0--2--------------------
D-----------------------0-2--3-----------------------------
A-------------0--2--3-----------------------------------
E--0--1--3----------------------------------------------

Is this not just a C Scale starting on the low E string? Perhaps you would call this the Aeolian mode?


I dunno, I'm not too sure about things like that. Teaching yourself sucks...!
#19
Phrygian mode of the C Major scale.
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#20
More information on harmonics:

A harmonic is simply a component frequency of the fundimental frequency of a sound (the frequency we hear and can identify). Sounds are all composed of several different harmonics along with the fundimental frequency (or the First harmonic)

Pinch harmonics and the like, performed on the guitar, are techniques to mute the dominate harmonic (the first harmonic) of a note allowing these extended harmonics to be audible.
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#21
Same as the Aeolian Mode of the A minor....
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Ibanez RG370DX
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#22
If you want to get all physicsy, when a string is played, it also vibrates at many other frequencies other than that of the fundamental. By placing your finger in different places, you create what is called a 'node' (a place where the string doesn't vibrate at all). Depending on where this is it will raise the frequency of a note by a certain amount.

12th fret - 1 octave
7th fret - 1 octave and 1 fifth
5th fret - 2 octaves

There are obviously loads of hamonics, but those are the only ones that can be easily done.
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Electronics God of the Laney Cult

My Gear:

Ibanez RG370DX
Laney VC30-212
Dunlop Crybaby
Boss CS-3
Ibanez TS9DX
#23
Quote by mcw00t
If you want to get all physicsy, when a string is played, it also vibrates at many other frequencies other than that of the fundamental. By placing your finger in different places, you create what is called a 'node' (a place where the string doesn't vibrate at all). Depending on where this is it will raise the frequency of a note by a certain amount.

12th fret - 1 octave
7th fret - 1 octave and 1 fifth
5th fret - 2 octaves

There are obviously loads of hamonics, but those are the only ones that can be easily done.


You can find all the harmonic sweet spots on each string by measuring the string length from the nut, to the saddle, and determine the lengths that when divided into the string length, return a whole number.
Schecter C-1 Classic (Antique Amber)
Ibanez JEM 7VWH
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