#1
ok so heres what happened in school today. so my friend was like how many songs do u know how to play. so i said about 12 (mostly intros) and he said how long have u been . i say since november. and he was like wow ive been in for 2 weeks and know like 3 songs. so i said i 'm more interested in theory then songs. and i told them its good to learn that and he said no there boring. so then i ask this kid whos been playing for while and he said he knows more theory and he said theory is better than learning songs. so heres the question, would i be a better player if i learned more scales or songs.

p.s im sorry this may sound kinda confusing but its hard to explain
i play alot fo metal and into iron maiden, slayer stuff like that, if u can can u suggest some songs that are good to know how to play.
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#2
Quote by silvertoness11
ok so heres what happened in school today. so my friend was like how many songs do u know how to play. so i said about 12 (mostly intros) and he said how long have u been . i say since november. and he was like wow ive been in for 2 weeks and know like 3 songs. so i said i 'm more interested in theory then songs. and i told them its good to learn that and he said no there boring. so then i ask this kid whos been playing for while and he said he knows more theory and he said theory is better than learning songs. so heres the question, would i be a better player if i learned more scales or songs.

p.s im sorry this may sound kinda confusing but its hard to explain
i play alot fo metal and into iron maiden, slayer stuff like that, if u can can u suggest some songs that are good to know how to play.


Well really, you should be doing both. To be playing since November and only knowing the intros to twelve songs mostly isn't that great really. You learn more by theory and by playing. Do a bit of both, and don't worry to much about others.
#3
theory, learn theory. if you learn songs, all you will be able to do is copy, you will end up in a cover band. if you study theory, and learn scales and such, you will become much more creative and could possibly end up in a band of your own


so, in conclusion, theory rules
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#4
[quote="'[A"]cetate']theory, learn theory. if you learn songs, all you will be able to do is copy, you will end up in a cover band. if you study theory, and learn scales and such, you will become much more creative and could possibly end up in a band of your own


so, in conclusion, theory rules
i have to aggree i make up some cool riffs or solos off scales.
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#5
Yes, you may get better, but you will mostly improve your technique in the fingers and picking hand.
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#6
Quote by thedude051
Well really, you should be doing both. To be playing since November and only knowing the intros to twelve songs mostly isn't that great really. You learn more by theory and by playing. Do a bit of both, and don't worry to much about others.



I totally agree! Scales are definetly good to learn but you also want to play songs so it isnt all work and no play!
#7
You should learn both. Just because you don't know theory doesn't mean you'll just copy. But you shouldn't not learn songs. They can increase your dexterity, general knowledge of how music is constructed, skill and you can jam with other musicians.
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#8
theory is good to know for your own stuff.

other songs are good to learn techniques : bending, sweeping, hammerons tapping ect.
#9
Quote by Kurapica
You should learn both. Just because you don't know theory doesn't mean you'll just copy. But you shouldn't not learn songs. They can increase your dexterity, general knowledge of how music is constructed, skill and you can jam with other musicians.

i mean like i know some pretty hard songs for some one whos only been playing since november. like i know all of the trooper except solos 2 minutes 2 midnight,, i kno like the really easy stuff like stuff i dont wanna mention( cough cough iron man,smoke on the water,enter sandman). can anyone suggest some songs for me?
esp ltd m300
ibanez rg
jackosn dinky strat

digitech rp155l
morley bad horsie wah

carvin mt3200 tube amp


founder of the ibanez rg owners of the world club pm me to join
#10
I am in the same boat. I learned a lot more theory and never put to much energy into alot of songs. Its almost been two years now and I don't necessarily have a full stable of songs at my finger tips but I can make up alot of stuff on the spot just because I have spent the time with my instrument and I know more theory then songs. I don't care tbh when it comes to people asking me to play crap cause I don't do the whole prove myself to people. I took up guitar for myself and possibly a band and unless I am feeling I dunno generous (can't think of a word) or I am with a band mate I won't play for people. But anywho I think you shoud put effort into learn both theory and songs. I have recently started to try and build my repitoire and I am not sure if its making me a better player but it is getting to be a bit more fun jamming along with some random songs I hear and what not. Only time will tell.

Edit: As for song suggestions how about
In Keeping the Secrets of Silent Earth - Coheed and Cambria (Builds endurance for me)
Time Consumer - Coheed and Cambria
Belief - John Mayer (Finger pick it and you will understand what I mean)
Hey Man - Emanuel
Confined -As I Lay Dying (Pretty simple but its a fun song)
Sweetness - Jimmy Eat World (Helps a bit with speed I guess)
Spin - Taking Back Sunday (Helps with hammeron an dpull off technique but then again I don't play it the same as some tabs on this site)
Perhaps Vampires is a Bit Strong But... - Arctic Monkeys (Helped me stay focus during songs. I tend to get bored sometimes)
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Last edited by OsirisProtocol at Mar 5, 2007,
#11
Learn some songs, get practicing techniques such as hammer-ons.pull-offs, slides, tapping, palm muting, harmonics etc. Its good that your learning theory at at early stage but its no good reading about scales and chords etc if you cant play the damn things.
#12
As much as I hated learning the boring stuff, it's essential to becoming a good guitar player, and especially a good soloist. Eventually, theory became really fun for me once I started to really get it. Learning modes and scales is an essential part of any musician's education. It's equally important to learn songs as well. They aren't mutally exclusive things. The problem is, if you only learn songs, you'll have a harder time writing your own, really intricate music. If you feel that theory is more important, go for it. Just don't forget to say "i told you so" to your friend once you match his skill and then pass it.
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#13
BOTH! Theory let's you know how music works. Playing other people's songs gives you a hands on lesson on the application of theory, as well as the basic mechanics of songwriting and soloing. Once you see how theory applies, and how songwriting works, start writing your own songs! Spend time developing your skills as a songwriter. The most gratifying experience is playing the music you have written for crowds that love it. Seeing the expressions and motion from the audience when you bare your soul to them is amazing.
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#14
If I want to learn or perfect a technique I always find a song with a good example of the technique in it and learn that. It helps you get a better grip on how to actually use the technique in a song, which is different from just being able to 'do' it.

Sure, I do exercises too, but its the songs that make learning guitar really worthwhile.
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#15
Theory dude- ive been playing 2 years and know next to none, but i know a tonne of songs ut it SUCKS- i have no real...independance or imagination to create my own stuff. Im trying to learn theory now but it's so hard seeing as im stuck in bad habits
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#16
[quote="'[A"]cetate']theory, learn theory. if you learn songs, all you will be able to do is copy, you will end up in a cover band. if you study theory, and learn scales and such, you will become much more creative and could possibly end up in a band of your own


so, in conclusion, theory rules


I disagree.

Learning both is the way to go. Learning songs helps you get ideas. If you only knew theory your music would be bland and boring.

Not bashing theory, i love theory, and i know plenty, but I use it to improve riffs that are already made, or when improvising (obviously).

Learning songs also helps with technique, and are a lot more fun to do then exercises.

Don't get me wrong im not saying dont do exercises, but it's very easy to burn yourself out when all you're doing is playing exercises for 3 hours.
#17
If you want to be a better musician, learn your theory. If you want to impress people, learn songs. If you want both, then do both. It's that simple.
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