#1
How would I go about changing regular open chords to barre chords? Or, where can I find a site that has all of the barre chords pictured or something. I would rather learn how to do it myself, though.

Thanks!
Fender American Deluxe V-Neck Strat
Laguna LG300CE Acoustic Electric
#2
Listen to the man below me...he is a god

The list or all barre chords, and all chords in general, can be found here
Last edited by YourMessiah666 at Mar 5, 2007,
#3
You find a root note that's not open, let's say A, because you can play that open. Now, to make it a barre chord, you find the root note (the note for which the chord is named). In this case it would be the 5th fret on the low-E string. Then you go a fifth above that note (7th fret on A string), an octave above the root (7th fret on D string), a Major third above that (6th fret on the G), and the next two notes on the B and E strings are the same fret as the rote (I don't know the interval name). The basic chord formation for any basic chord is the same is E (0-2-2-1-0 from bottom to top). Use that same formation at any fret, so that an A would be 5-7-7-6-5-5. As for minor chords, drop the major 3rd, so that A minor would be 5-7-7-5-5-5.

I hope that makes sense...
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Last edited by E V H 5150 at Mar 5, 2007,
#4
Quote by E V H 5150
You find a root note that's not open, let's say A, because you can play that open. Now, to make it a barre chord, you find the root note (the note for which the chord is named). In this case it would be the 5th fret on the low-E string. Then you go a fifth above that note (7th fret on A string), an octave above the root (7th fret on D string), a Major third above that (6th fret on the G), and the next two notes on the B and E strings are the same fret as the rote (I don't know the interval name). The basic chord formation for any basic chord is the same is E (0-2-2-1-0 from bottom to top). Use that same formation at any fret, so that an A would be 5-7-7-6-5-5. As for minor chords, drop the major 3rd, so that A minor would be 5-7-7-5-5-5.

I hope that makes sense...


Ya thats right on.

But if you dont want to play an Eb barre chord on the 11 fret of the low E string, well then this is what you should do.

Find your root on the A string (5th string). From there, move up a string, and 2 frets over to the right. Then move that up another string. And then one more string. Then move back 2 frets to the left for the high E string.

So if you wanted a D barre chord without going to the 10th fret on the low E, then do this. Fret the 5th fret on the A string because thats D root we want. Fret the 7th fret on the D, G and B strings. Then fret the 5th fret of the high E string.

Now these barre chords are harder than the ones on the low E string, but it will save you a lot of jumping around.
Quote by funkdaddyfresh
justin, that was easily the most inspiring, helpful piece of advice anyone has ever given me in regards to my musical pursuits.


Screaming Help
#5
Will just use your indix finger as a bar or the nut and slide it
whatever key or pitch you want.

The patterns of scale or chords pretty much repeat itself in
veriouse places of the guitar.

here's simple excersize i do

bar the Dmin at the 5th fret (Open Amin shuffle down to the 5th fret)

My index finger is acting like the nut.
I raise pinky finger from (G string fret 7) to (A string fret 8)
This transform the chord into a F maj as if I'm playing a C maj in open posistion.

I keep my index finger at the 5th fret and continue to make other open
chords pattern there.

When i solo...once i locate the tonic and relative minor.....it's all down hill
from there.