#1
Ive started recording some guitar parts and I'm wondering if anyone has any ideas or tutorials on how to mix? What exactly does it mean to mix a song properly? I have Sonar 6 Producer Edition but I'm not sure how to mix anything with this software. Any advice?
#2
Mixing is basically volume levels and equalizers.. making sure everything is heard in the right amounts *edit* without clipping. It's pretty much a personal taste thing.

If you're just doing guitars though then you probably won't be needing much mixing, if any,.
hug your local pug dealer!
Last edited by cody733 at Mar 5, 2007,
#4
Well I learned alot of my stuff through a class that made us mix through pro tools. Like the first guy said, just make sure you get volumes and equalizer right. Fade your tracks so they don't click. Make cool effects like reverse or plug ins. If you have a really nice program, theres tons of stuff you can do to a track.
#5
Quote by cody733
Mixing is basically volume levels and equalizers.. making sure everything is heard in the right amounts *edit* without clipping. It's pretty much a personal taste thing.

If you're just doing guitars though then you probably won't be needing much mixing, if any,.


*BZZZZZT* wrong but thanks for playing, we have some lovely parting gifts for you....

mixing is as someone said basically eq'ing out the level. some things to keep in mind is levels and panning. a good mix should have every instrument clearly heard. normal panning procedures are about 70% r/l (some people do hard left, hard right, that really is a personal preference) if you have multiple guitar tracks (like 6 +) you want to spread them evenly out over the L/R spaces. dual guitar tracks (such as guitars doing a dual harmony) will want to be mixed close together on the same side. levels should almost clip at the loudest point in the song (if you don't know what clipping is please ask) also, another word to get the most pro-sounding recording is COMPRESSION, learn it, get it, love it. compression will restrict your instrument to the frequency its more or less meant for. if you have multiple instruments taking up the same frequency range, things start to get muddy. compression will also really take and push the sound of the instrument out without making it louder. think about compression like this, you don't want your vocals and guitar competing for the same frequency range do you? i didn't think so. also, effects are fun but can be time consuming. if you plan on recording with effects through an external processor, make sure that you have perfect input leveling before recording, as if you do not, you will have to correct the inaccuracy and go back and record the FX'd piece. however if you do effect mixing AFTER the piece is recorded its easier to alter what you are doing and make changes over and over without affecting the original piece. i'm preferential of effects through an external FX box as i like the way it sounds (more organic imo) but whatever floats your boat! there are TONS more, but this is just the basics to get you started, hope this helped, peace out

-z
#6
Som'in like that.
As you mix more and more you'll notice about frequency range.

Keep also in mind.
It also depend on the speakers or head phones you're using.

It might sound good coming through your speaker or phone.
Due to the frequency perimeter of your speakers or phone.
but once you play back on other units, or speakers it's another story.
So if you just mess with the EQ, it's mute in some cases.

Basially..lets say your speakers lack Bass frequency and you trun up
the bass volume to compensate...it sounds good to you.
When I listen to it from a differnt amp unit and speakers.
All I hear is the damn bass even if i lower the bass on my EQ of
my play back unit.
Sometimes it's the treble.

there's also denisity of the sounds or digital single.

thats why it's important to log or make notes of your input settings
(tones, volume..ect). it's a pain if you don't, if you need to make corrections
later or alter a note here or there.
Last edited by Ordinary at Mar 6, 2007,
#7
yeah thats another thing i failed to mention, listen to the mix on several different stereo systems, i recommend car, full home stereo and headphones. headphones tend to highlight the mid and upper ranges and don't push a lot of bass, where as a home stereo and different car stereos may have different speaker sizes and subwoofers that push harder or softer. you want it to sound good on all of them (although it won't really sound the same on all systems you're pushing for a kind of universal good so that regardless of what type of system you play it through it sounds good and the right frquencies are pushed at the right level)