#1
Week ONE

So I've had an electric guitar for a couple years, but was always too intimidated to get into it. Last week, I'd had enough of it just sitting there and decided to pick it up again. Rather than try to learn the strings from the beginning, which required the dexterity and patience that I simply do not have at this point, I made it a point to go straight to chords. The possibility that I could make something sound cool, I figured, would hook me on the instrument. So I did some browsing on the internet and found the caged method. The method, apparently, is to simply use the C, A, G, E, and D chords as references for the rest of the guitar. I messed around with it, but it still didn't hook me. Still, I made it a point to walk around the house with the guitar strapped to me, just to acclimatize myself with the instrument. Meanwhile, I screwed around the opening to KISS- Shout It Out Loud. That alone was enough to get me to week 2, and also got me a little bit of experience in bending.
#2
Week TWO

So now I'm in my second week. Things were looking dire until I grabbed this book titled "Teach Yourself Visually - Guitar". It was just what I needed. Realistically, at this early point, theory and terminology are going to do nothing but frustrate me further. Granted, once I've been playing for a couple months, I'll WANT to integrate theory into teaching myself, but it's not my time for that. I just need that ray of sunlight- and I got that today. I did my first chord progression! There was this particularly easy one: G to E minor. For this, I was able to keep my index finger in one place, which eliminated the whole "move your entire hand around the fretboard" stress that kept me from plunging into chords headfirst. I was only required to move two fingers, which let me concentrate on strumming and listening to the fruits of my labor. For the rest of the week, I intend to work on G-Em, and then integrate some other progressions that allow me to use a finger as a pivot.
Weapons of choice-
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Fender MIM Jazz Bass

Favorite genre-

Hard Rock
Hair Metal
Classic Metal
J-Rock

#3
Week THREE

So I've just basically been ****ing around with the guitar all week. Occasionally, I'll work on cords, but I've mostly just been strumming whatever sounds nice. At this point, I'm absolutely convinced that, if you just chill out and get comfortable with the instrument, improvement will happen naturally. Another upside is that, now that my strumming is getting a little more fluid, I suddenly have one less hand to worry about. I was considering using the CAGED method up until this week, but I decided to just learn whatever I pick up. I'd rather not slow myself down with an education method when I'd be much more able in just learning what I'm able to pick up at that point in time. For instance, hammer ons and pull offs are simple for me because I have an ear for them, so it makes more sense to use that to get more comfortable with the instrument, rather than frustrate myself with anything else at the moment.
Weapons of choice-
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Fender MIM Jazz Bass

Favorite genre-

Hard Rock
Hair Metal
Classic Metal
J-Rock

#4
Chords is definitely the best place to start, builds finger strength quickly and they sound nice fairly easily. Whilst your learning them though try to get your head round the rules that govern how they're formed, essentially every chord of any type is the same, as in the other notes in relation to the root note.

I'll link you to a post I did about it a week or two ago, hopefully it'll be helpful.

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showpost.php?p=8422828&postcount=3
Actually called Mark!

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#5
Quote by steven seagull
Chords is definitely the best place to start, builds finger strength quickly and they sound nice fairly easily. Whilst your learning them though try to get your head round the rules that govern how they're formed, essentially every chord of any type is the same, as in the other notes in relation to the root note.

I'll link you to a post I did about it a week or two ago, hopefully it'll be helpful.

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showpost.php?p=8422828&postcount=3


Thanks.
Weapons of choice-
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Fender MIM Jazz Bass

Favorite genre-

Hard Rock
Hair Metal
Classic Metal
J-Rock

#6
WEEK FOUR AND FIVE

I was absolutely right. ACGED major and the basic minors are the key places to start. I can fairly confidently change chords on similar frets in the course of a single month. Of course, my father is a self-taught Spanish guitarist, so I have some of the skill in my blood. Still, I think the basic chords are absolutely the best place to start.

Just some thoughts on what I'm learning--

-Spend your first day with the guitar just ****ing around with the strings. Learn the string order. Maybe learn a single open major chord to use as your basis. Keep using that chord daily.
-Introduce a minor chord that shares finger positions a few days later. Just work on changing fingers between those two chords. The best way to build up the right dexterity is to practice with what you'll be using in the end. Just walk around the house all day with the guitar on. Let it feel comfortable in your hands.
-In a week, pick up another chord and learn how to change chords between all three. Work up until the point where you know all major open chords (screw 7,9, sus, add and all that for now).
-Pick up F as your first "barre" chord. Use the opportunity to learn a LITTLE BIT of theory. Not before. You'll get in way over your head. You do your best learning with a real frame of reference anyway.

Of course, those are just observations.
Weapons of choice-
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Fender MIM Jazz Bass

Favorite genre-

Hard Rock
Hair Metal
Classic Metal
J-Rock

#7
why don't you follow a book all the way through or get some kind of plan, it is a lot better than jsut dicking around and trying to learn parts of songs. eventually you are gonna have to do all this borin g crap no matter what if you want to improve
#8
Quote by alien420
why don't you follow a book all the way through or get some kind of plan, it is a lot better than jsut dicking around and trying to learn parts of songs. eventually you are gonna have to do all this borin g crap no matter what if you want to improve



If you learn in an order you want to learn in, none of it is boring. I'd rather play and THEN learn theory later, which will actually give me an appreciation for it.
Weapons of choice-
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Fender MIM Jazz Bass

Favorite genre-

Hard Rock
Hair Metal
Classic Metal
J-Rock