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#1
I'm considering learning to play along with guitar that I'm already learning, but I'm wondering how much it costs to get a decent kit, and whether lessons are worth it (I'm already paying $76 for guitar).


I couldn't find any other board that this would be on topic at.
#2
Lessons, arent worth it in my opinion, I learned more from playing along with songs, than somebody saying Left, right, left, right.
EDIT: You should probably buy a book showing you a bunch of rudiments and exercises, and learn at your own pace, it's a hell of a lot cheaper
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#3
Lessons helped me play drums, i took lessons for about a year and i got down all the basics then i quit lessons and went on my own. Also a decent kit would go for 300-500 dollars.
#4
+1 ^
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#6
proper techniques is a good thing to learn....like guitar, its the same for drums..you can learn rudiments and excercises as much as you want, unless you ask the right questins and learn from the right people youll most likely get to a point where you cant learn anymore becasue youre used to the wrong techniques.

a decent kit will run you about 1000 - 1500,
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#7
>_>


That's quite a difference in prices... My birthday is in April, so then I might just get like a $400 kit or something along those lines... how technically difficult do the drums get, anyways?
#8
If you want drumming to be a hobby you could just get lessons for a few weeks but if you want to be an "uber hardcore drummer" I'd recommend lessons.
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#9
Drum lessons are a complete waste.
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#10
Depends on what you're playing. Pop drums aren't really that hard but metal stuff can get insanely technical. Or if punk's your thing, you don't even need to be able to play at all.
#11
Drum lessons are a pretty big waste, I took them for the first 8 weeks after I started playing just to learn basic rudiments and such but then I stopped because they were wasting my time, and you can get a decent kit for about 500 dollars if you know where to look, or you could get an exceptional kit but get it used, that's what I did for my first (and only) kit
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#12
My friend and I have been playing Drums since mid December (he got them as a gift, so he plays more often), but we're getting decent. We can both hold up a steady beat, play fills, even some cheap soloing and such. We're both Guitar players, but we picked up Drums rather easily, even though we still have quite a bit to learn.

I suggest buying a kit at a minimum of $300. That will have you set for a Snare, about 3 Toms, a Bass drum, a passable Crash Cymbal, and a probably a rather shoddy Hi-Hat. After that, check out the clearance section of Musician's Friend, and look for a Hi-Hat, and any other Cymbals/Drums you might want. a small 6" Zildjian China Cymbal is generally a good investment, and can be bought rather cheap from the clearance section. You can go Meg White and buy a big 22" Cymbal to add something there.

A general good suggestion is to throw some big sweater or some such inside of your Bass Drum to dampen it a lot. With no damping, it rings out much more than usually wanted, and doesn't give that chest pounding "Thud!" that you want, but more of a "Thuddddd....!" if you get what I mean.

Hope that helps.
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#13
Quote by Barbarastreisnd
Depends on what you're playing. Pop drums aren't really that hard but metal stuff can get insanely technical. Or if punk's your thing, you don't even need to be able to play at all.



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Maybe I should consider the fiddle and banjo as well... piano would be interesting, but... not interesting enough.
#14
I would not take drum lessons. Just take some simple songs at first, I guess like 7 Nation Army. You can pretty much do any 4/4 beat with that song. The best thing to do is just learn other songs.
#15
Quote by Habit Zero
>_>


That's quite a difference in prices... My birthday is in April, so then I might just get like a $400 kit or something along those lines... how technically difficult do the drums get, anyways?



400 you can get a beginner kit, generic skins, single braced hardware, and a cheap throne. Itll do for learning, but IMO, its not a decent kit. Definity rock one to learn and practice on though. Drum stuff is expensive!!! most kits, you buy without hardware or cymbals, then you gotta dish out for that stuff later on, so you end up paying at least 1 grand for it.

tehcnically, its not hard to get the basics, if you understand rhythm and timing, then youre already ahead of the beginner beginners.
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#16
Quote by Habit Zero
>_>


That's quite a difference in prices... My birthday is in April, so then I might just get like a $400 kit or something along those lines... how technically difficult do the drums get, anyways?


(Sorry in advance if this ends up being a double post)

Basically, they can get as technical as you want them to be. One suggestion is though, teach yourself much more than that basic Rock beat, you know, Hi-Hat every 8th, Bass Drum on 1 and 3, Snare on 2 and 4. Just learn more, mess around and find what sounds good, then remember that, and mess around some more.
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#17
Quote by ark
400 you can get a beginner kit, generic skins, single braced hardware, and a cheap throne. Itll do for learning, but IMO, its not a decent kit. Definity rock one to learn and practice on though. Drum stuff is expensive!!! most kits, you buy without hardware or cymbals, then you gotta dish out for that stuff later on, so you end up paying at least 1 grand for it.

tehcnically, its not hard to get the basics, if you understand rhythm and timing, then youre already ahead of the beginner beginners.


Every kit i've seen has come with hardware
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#18
Quote by lemon
Every kit i've seen has come with hardware



Wrong. Have you ever heard of a shell kit?

Do you have any specific questions i can answer for you? I have been playing drums
for about 4 years, and am pretty decent. I can play hip hop beats, solid double bass, some jazz, and practice religiously with a metronome. Other than that, pick up some books!

Good luck
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#19
Quote by MySweetFracture
Wrong. Have you ever heard of a shell kit?

Do you have any specific questions i can answer for you? I have been playing drums
for about 4 years, and am pretty decent. I can play hip hop beats, solid double bass, some jazz, and practice religiously with a metronome. Other than that, pick up some books!

Good luck



No real questions, just wondering if I want to start drums now, or get a better guitar and amp then start drums later on (only been playing guitar a few months, so I'm thinking of going with choice #2).
#20
Yea, im thinking of buying drums too, and what im going to do is buy a 200-400$ kit with toms, hi-hat, snare, and ride and just keep adding on.

By the way, where do you even buy a drumset? My guitar center doesnt have one the last time i went there, and my local drum pad only has parts.
Last edited by Kurt123 at Mar 6, 2007,
#21
Dude one peice peice of advice I can give you is count out loud, and about the prices if you have 400 you should be fine. Im asumming you have a metronome and all that because your a guitarist. If you want a good sound also get some good heads right away.
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#22
Quote by StreetLight3989
Dude one peice peice of advice I can give you is count out loud, and about the prices if you have 400 you should be fine. Im asumming you have a metronome and all that because your a guitarist. If you want a good sound also get some good heads right away.



No metronome... >_> I have a chromatic tuner though.
#23
I learned most of what I know from playing in a band for a while but i've recently started lessons for the more technical stuff. it's worth it to a certain point but soon I'm going back to being self taught. and for the kit, i think mine was around 700can. and its a pretty good kit.
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#24
I've been playing for about 8 years now. Let's see if I can help.
In my opinion, lessons are not worth it. You can probably find decent lessons online for free if you really feel the need. Drumming is not like guitar. You don't need to learn theory or all that jazz to become good. Drumming is about developing technique, not cramming information into your head. Sure, basic knowledge of rudiments and the like helps with developing technique, but as you progress, rudiments become habits. Another thing is that a lot of people do not think a drummer is good at what he does unless he is fast. Not true. Sure, speed is always a plus, but it's not necessary. Most good famous drummers probably can play fast, but the great ones don't need to. Take Keith Moon, for example. Listen to some Who albums. He doesn't use speed often. However, he had an amazing technique which is what made him so good.
/rant.
As for a good starter kit, be prepared to spend anything between $200-$500.
Hope I was some help.
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#25
Quote by MySweetFracture
Wrong. Have you ever heard of a shell kit?

Do you have any specific questions i can answer for you? I have been playing drums
for about 4 years, and am pretty decent. I can play hip hop beats, solid double bass, some jazz, and practice religiously with a metronome. Other than that, pick up some books!

Good luck


Wait, wait, wait, so I say every kit I'VE SEEN has come with hardware, and you're telling me that i've seen kits that haven't, has it ever occurred to you that none of the stores I've been too stock shell kits? Think before you talk

post script: I don't shop online and none of my local stores actually stock shell kits, weird...
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Last edited by lemon at Mar 6, 2007,
#26
Quote by lemon
Wait, wait, wait, so I say every kit I'VE SEEN has come with hardware, and you're telling me that i've seen kits that haven't, has it ever occurred to you that none of the stores I've been too stock shell kits? Think before you talk

post script: I don't shop online and none of my local stores actually stock shell kits, weird...



No.
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#27
Quote by MySweetFracture
No.


No what?
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#28
Quote by lemon
No what?

He's trying to make you look stupid. It is possible that the stores you have been to don't stock shell kits. Some shops near me don't even stock drums. Given your current situation, you have two options: buy whatever the stores have or do what I did and by a whole bunch of used gear and piece a set together. I've had the same set for the whole time I have been a drummer. I don't see anything wrong with it. Of course it's much bigger now as I have added many new drums to it, but it still has the same one snare, 2 tom, hi hat, crash, ride, and bass that i started out with.
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#29
Quote by astepabove
He's trying to make you look stupid. It is possible that the stores you have been to don't stock shell kits. Some shops near me don't even stock drums. Given your current situation, you have two options: buy whatever the stores have or do what I did and by a whole bunch of used gear and piece a set together. I've had the same set for the whole time I have been a drummer. I don't see anything wrong with it. Of course it's much bigger now as I have added many new drums to it, but it still has the same one snare, 2 tom, hi hat, crash, ride, and bass that i started out with.


Yes well he's a dick, and I find it weird, there's a store near me that only sells drums yet they don't even stock shell kits, i've only bought one kit though and it came with full hardware. Though I haven't really changed anything except the cymbals and the bass pedal
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#30
Quote by lemon
Yes well he's a dick, and I find it weird, there's a store near me that only sells drums yet they don't even stock shell kits, i've only bought one kit though and it came with full hardware. Though I haven't really changed anything except the cymbals and the bass pedal



Relax man, have you ever looked in a music catalog? Maybe they dont sell them around you. They have them at guitar centers here, and independent music shops. If i would have know that you could get this butt hurt, i wouldn't have said anything. Cheers
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#31
i say start with one and go on to the other later...

or experiment with both until you figure out which one is worth your investment (everyone plays guitar anyways, not well... but everyone does)
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#32
Quote by lemon
Yes well he's a dick, and I find it weird, there's a store near me that only sells drums yet they don't even stock shell kits, i've only bought one kit though and it came with full hardware. Though I haven't really changed anything except the cymbals and the bass pedal

Is it a small store? If it is, the owners might be morons like all of the music shop owners near me. Usually i stick to Sam Ash or Guitar Center for new drum equipment. Musician's Friend has some good stuff too, but you can't try it before you buy it which is a big no-no with drums.
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#33
Quote by MySweetFracture
Relax man, have you ever looked in a music catalog? If i would have know that you could get this but hurt, i wouldn't have said anything. Cheers


Nah man i'm not hurt, and actually now i've never really looked through any music catalogs aside from when I was looking for some new cymbals.

Anyway it's all good
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#34
Quote by lemon
Nah man i'm not hurt, and actually now i've never really looked through any music catalogs aside from when I was looking for some new cymbals.

Anyway it's all good
My honest opinion is avoid catalogues because like I said in a previous post, you can't try before you buy. It happened to me when i first started drumming. I bought a new cymbal/drum/whatever because I thought it would sound cool. Of course when I got said drum/cymbal/whatever, I end up regretting the purchase and selling it soon thereafter. Anyway, I hope I was some help. PM me if you want to know anything else.
Cheers!
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#35
Teach drums to yourself, or have a friend teach you. I learned how to play just by listening to songs, and then trying to play them the exact way they were meant to be, and I'm better than most of the drummers I've been in bands with.
#36
dont do lessons...waste of money

my brother took lessons back in the day, and my parents bought him a drumset. he ended up quitting, but whenver he just jams once in a while, i own him and ive never had a drum lesson. if you have natural rhythm, drums are kinda easy (excluding technical stuff)
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#37
Quote by astepabove
My honest opinion is avoid catalogues because like I said in a previous post, you can't try before you buy. It happened to me when i first started drumming. I bought a new cymbal/drum/whatever because I thought it would sound cool. Of course when I got said drum/cymbal/whatever, I end up regretting the purchase and selling it soon thereafter. Anyway, I hope I was some help. PM me if you want to know anything else.
Cheers!



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#38
Quote by astepabove
My honest opinion is avoid catalogues because like I said in a previous post, you can't try before you buy. It happened to me when i first started drumming. I bought a new cymbal/drum/whatever because I thought it would sound cool. Of course when I got said drum/cymbal/whatever, I end up regretting the purchase and selling it soon thereafter. Anyway, I hope I was some help. PM me if you want to know anything else.
Cheers!


Yeah, I originally made the mistake of trying before buying, I knew which kit I wanted but I had no idea about the cymbals so the guy just picked up a pack and I said sure whatever i'll take the, they were Sabian B8's, worst decision of my life
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