#1
hi all,

im considering refinishing my srv strat with a nitro finish; it'll cost a bit cos i couldn't do it myself, do you think this will change the tone a great deal, or is this a fool's errand of an idea?

ive just bought some sd red house pickups and shielded the guitar cavity, which have really transformed the tone, im hoping a thin nitro coat, getting rid of the thick poly, will age it better as this will be my main workhorse
what are your thoughts?

oh and is pre-cat nitro indistinguishable from regular nitro lacquer,

thanks in advance
stargazing

fender mexican strat > carol ann tucana 2 > mongotone 2x10
Last edited by Jonny Cacique at Mar 6, 2007,
#2
It'll age better, but it won't effect the sound noticably.
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#3
^you, sir, have the greatest sig ever...

and no, it wont affect your sound

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#4
Some people think it has a slight effect on the sound, but I don't agree. I just think it ages better, and is probally better for the wood.
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#5
Some people say it lets the wood breathe more and therefore slightly improving the sound&vibrations.

It'll age well in the long run too, like a proper 50's or 60's Strat.

And read some tutorials and learn to do it yourself, I was going to do it, but then changed my mind and decided I like my Strat's colour. It'll save you so much money too.
"Breathe, breathe in the air
Don't be afraid to care"

Fender Strat/Tokai LS80>few pedals>Orange Rocker 30
#6
thanks for the input!

it definitely makes more financial sense to learn to do it yourself, but hey im a product of western culture and i'd rather pay a pro to do a great job

i remember hearing the immortal line 'you could land an aeroplane on it'
and hell he wasn't exaggerating, on a lot of the strats i've seen the poly finish is v. thick, is that cost cutting?

this guy does some 1337 work
http://www.dm-guitars.co.uk/paintwork.htm

but yea, quite expensive
i think for the ageing aspect, like you ppl said, it'll be better in the long run
what colour is yours?
stargazing

fender mexican strat > carol ann tucana 2 > mongotone 2x10
#7
Mine's 3 colour sunburst (poly finish) and I wanted to change it to 2 colour sunburst (nitro).
It was too much hassle for such a little change though.

And the poly IS thick, mine's got a few chips though, some natural, some intentional.
"Breathe, breathe in the air
Don't be afraid to care"

Fender Strat/Tokai LS80>few pedals>Orange Rocker 30
#8
The Polyester on MIM Fenders aren't too bad, but the Polyurethane on my MIK Tele is terrible. Definitely a mm or two thick. It doesn't dent either; it cracks, kind of like a window; so I have loads of little 'stars' on the edges.
#9
cool, sunbursts are my favourite style of finish - you mean 2tone like on the EJ strat,

yea that sucks, and like rhcp says, its such a mission to refinish, but on the plus the fender tele is a pretty legendary tool, every one i've played i've thought played awesomely (maybe pot luck!)

gotta love the twang!
stargazing

fender mexican strat > carol ann tucana 2 > mongotone 2x10
#10
Quote by R_H_C_P
Some people say it lets the wood breathe more and therefore slightly improving the sound&vibrations.



That's a fairy tale that has its roots in the lutherie of old. An acoustic guitar definitely will benefit from as thin a finish as possible. An electric? No. The choice of wood definitely has an effect on tone, but the finish does not. Especially on a Strat with the big pickguard. The strings are anchored solidly to the body through the bridge. Its mass will have an effect on sustain. The finish is only important at the neck/body interface. This joint ideally should be free of finish with wood firmly anchored to wood to allow the vibrations from the neck to propogate through to the body and vice-versa.

Poly finish was a nod to mass production, as it does not require any further work like lacquer does. It is also far more durable, does not react in contact with plastics (stands, etc) and has far fewer long-term health problems for people who work with it relative to Nitrocellulose lacquer. If I was building an archtop or an acoustic guitar, I would be far more concerned with the finish, but for a Strat, just use what is easiest and safest for you. I would bet a sizeable chunk of money ttha in a blind test, nobody could discern a tonal difference in finishes between otherwise identical Strats.
#11
ahh ok, so you think the reason for refinishing should be for purely aesthetic reasons?

thats something to ponder...
stargazing

fender mexican strat > carol ann tucana 2 > mongotone 2x10
#12
The one compelling reason to use lacquer is the ease with which you can do a burst finish. You simply tint clear lacquer and spray. Poly will build far too much for a burst. You need to use varios dyes underneath an overall clear coat, and trust me, clear poly is a bugger to spray. You can't see it go on, so runs are common. Lacquer sands better afterwards, but requires several weeks to finish 'shrinking' into the grain before you can start. Poly can be sanded and buffed within days with no shrinkage later.
#13
thanks for the help, appreciate it

stargazing

fender mexican strat > carol ann tucana 2 > mongotone 2x10