#1
i recently got a new guitarist in my band and im trying to harmonise the parts so we have something to play together... thing is ive never learnt this side to guitar and was wandering if anyone could help start me off at all..... thank you
#3
First off, you need to learn about intervals. Whenever you harmonize a note, you play another note at the same time which is at a specific interval from the base note. The most common form of harmonizing would either be in thirds or eighths (octaves).

An example of a third would be:


E||-------||
B||-------||
G||-------||
D||--5----||
A||--7----||
E||-------||


That would be a minor interval. If you have any knowledge of chords, you would also notice that this is also the base of a minor triad. This can mean that if you want to harmonize using a third guitar, you could simply continue the chord.

Now, harmonizing in thirds is like playing chords. If you keep playing minor chords after one another, odds are it wont sound very pretty. You need a combination of major and minor chords to sound good. (Of course I'm speaking very generally and in the simplest case scenario). Same with thirds. I believe there is a formula for knowing which thirds go after one another, but I cannot recall it at the moment so forgive me. You can probably find it and read a lot more about harmonizing in the MT Sticky FAQ, found here.
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#4
Say you're harmonizing in thirds in Amin, this means you're playing something and the other guy is playing it a diatonic (withing the key) 3rd higher

E.G.
the notes your playing are
A B D B
Then your other guitarist would play
C D F D

Amin scale
A B C D E F G


As you can see there is just a note in between what you are playing and what he is playing. That's a 3rd.
Hope that helps.
There are loads of different ways of harmonizing such as in 4ths or 5ths, 6ths
Only your imagination is the limit.
#5
than ks for that guys... ill go check out the sticky now... and ive tried the whole follow a simple pattern and as you said it ddnt sound quite right on some notes :S
#6
Use whatever sound cool. Minor thirds and fifths can be used as a base point, and some octaves couldn't hurt. But if you're able to, which you may not be, it helps to already know the sound you're after and to be able to pick it out.
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