#1
I just went over do my fathers house the other day because he got a new Mesa Boogie tube amp. Thing sounds so crisp and yummie. Playe some stuff that sounds a lot like The Ventures.

Anyway, he's knows almost no music theory, not even what key. But he was playing in, the proper major/minor scales/keys every time switching between blues, gypsie, pentatonic and other types of scales AND modes when needed. Knows NOTHING about theory! It blows my mind how awesome the human mind is. I watched his solo's and lead and they followed every rule but it came straight from the heart.

This makes me afraid to focus *TOO* much on theory, so I've decided to still play mostly by feel, but to learn everything I can about theory so I understand what I feel and can jam with other musicians. Does this seem like the standard best way?
#2
I love how people claim they play "with feel" as if it has anything to do with music theory. Music theory explains why musical concepts sound the way they do. That's it. You can play with all the feel in the world, but theory is going to cut down on the guess work. There is absolutely no reason not to learn theory.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#4
Quote by Jeff Manthei
you need a book to tell you what you feel? wow, lay off the books and free-ball it.


No. There is no downside to learning theory, not a single reason not to. Theory will make it infinitely easier to convey emotion through your playing.
All the "feel" in the world won't make up for a crappy song.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#5
Music Theory is just a tool to use when writing songs, every song should come from the soul! there is no doubt about it!
#6
I've never learnt any theory really.

It's a bit sad of me really, but I like to think I know what is right and wrong when playing.

I guess I class that as feel to playing,
Quote by demoniacfashion
Is there any black people on UG?
I don't think a lot of black people play guitar anymore.

Quote by Oasis-fanatic
they all kinda went extinct after hendrix really.


Needless to say, I lol'ed.

Quote by human panda
Appart from being on UG or wanking, thats what i mostly do
#7
Quote by Xerk
I just went over do my fathers house the other day because he got a new Mesa Boogie tube amp. Thing sounds so crisp and yummie. Playe some stuff that sounds a lot like The Ventures.

Anyway, he's knows almost no music theory, not even what key. But he was playing in, the proper major/minor scales/keys every time switching between blues, gypsie, pentatonic and other types of scales AND modes when needed. Knows NOTHING about theory! It blows my mind how awesome the human mind is. I watched his solo's and lead and they followed every rule but it came straight from the heart.

This makes me afraid to focus *TOO* much on theory, so I've decided to still play mostly by feel, but to learn everything I can about theory so I understand what I feel and can jam with other musicians. Does this seem like the standard best way?


A lot of jazz musicians have said things like learn all the theory you can, then when it's time to play forget about that shit and just jam. Everything you learn will help you, and the ideal is for it to come through subconsciously without you having to think about it. You have a good point, constantly thinking about theory while you're playing can be somewhat mechanical and can actually hinder your creativity & expression
#8
Quote by Stash Jam
A lot of jazz musicians have said things like learn all the theory you can, then when it's time to play forget about that shit and just jam. Everything you learn will help you, and the ideal is for it to come through subconsciously without you having to think about it. You have a good point, constantly thinking about theory while you're playing can be somewhat mechanical and can actually hinder your creativity & expression


How would it hinder your creativity? There are no rules in theory, theory just explains why certain musical concepts sound the way they do. If anything, theory makes you more creative by allowing you do express what you want through your music instead of making blind guesses.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#9
Quote by Archeo Avis
How would it hinder your creativity? There are no rules in theory, theory just explains why certain musical concepts sound the way they do. If anything, theory makes you more creative by allowing you do express what you want through your music instead of making blind guesses.


Well there are tons of rules/formulas etc in theory (which can all be broken, good sound trumps theory)... But what I'm saying is you should learn all the theory you possibly can and those concepts will come through in your playing whether your constantly thinking about them or not. It's not the same for everyone obviously, but for some not having to think about all those concepts while playing helps them to be more creative. Like they can just try to play a melody that comes to their mind instead of thinking about what interval, scale, etc it is, and just play it.
#10
Quote by Stash Jam
Well there are tons of rules/formulas etc in theory (which can all be broken, good sound trumps theory)... But what I'm saying is you should learn all the theory you possibly can and those concepts will come through in your playing whether your constantly thinking about them or not. It's not the same for everyone obviously, but for some not having to think about all those concepts while playing helps them to be more creative. Like they can just try to play a melody that comes to their mind instead of thinking about what interval, scale, etc it is, and just play it.


And what if that melody sounds dissonant as hell over the progression you're playing over? Maybe you want it to, but in either case, theory is going to tell you what sounds dissonant.

And no, there are no rules in theory.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#11
right, but I'm talking more about the difference between studying/practicing theory and actually applying it to your performing. Like I said it's not the same for everyone, and I fully support the notion of learning all the theory that you possibly can. It's just some people feel it's more natural to just play what they 'feel' as opposed to being analytical about every note choice. Neither approach is right or wrong, it's all about the results and the player's mindset
#12
People learn to "feel" the theoretically correct scales because they are used in almost all type of Western music. Hence, by simply listening to music all the time, you're absorbing these scales slowly. Learning theory is just saving your brain some time in my opinion, as instead of learning over many years to hears these notes, you're showing your brain the original locations instead.
Main Gear:
Cort G-Series 254
Takamine EG345C 12-String
Fender Squier P-Bass

Peavey Classic 50
Laney HCM65B

$75 Junk Drums w/ B8 Hats/Crash/Ride
#13
Quote by Stash Jam
right, but I'm talking more about the difference between studying/practicing theory and actually applying it to your performing. Like I said it's not the same for everyone, and I fully support the notion of learning all the theory that you possibly can. It's just some people feel it's more natural to just play what they 'feel' as opposed to being analytical about every note choice. Neither approach is right or wrong, it's all about the results and the player's mindset


How do you play what you "feel" if you have no idea what it's going to sound like?
It's like trying to communicate with another person but refusing to learn the language because you want to say what you "feel"
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#14
Quote by Archeo Avis
How do you play what you "feel" if you have no idea what it's going to sound like?
It's like trying to communicate with another person but refusing to learn the language because you want to say what you "feel"


Did you read the post you quoted?
#15
NONONO, we just went through this.

I'm losing my hair.

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=538404

Sigh. Go there.

Knowledge does not cancel out feel. Knowledge does not cancel out feel. Knowledge does not cancel out feel. Knowledge does not cancel out feel. Knowledge does not cancel out feel. Knowledge does not cancel out feel. Knowledge does not cancel out feel. Knowledge does not cancel out feel. Knowledge does not cancel out feel. Knowledge does not cancel out feel. Knowledge does not cancel out feel. Knowledge does not cancel out feel.
Don't tell me what can not be done

Don't tell me what can be done, either.



I love you all no matter what.
#16
Quote by Archeo Avis
How do you play what you "feel" if you have no idea what it's going to sound like?
It's like trying to communicate with another person but refusing to learn the language because you want to say what you "feel"


well to elaborate I already said you should learn all the theory you possibly can. Study it, practice it, talk about it etc... that gives you a great idea of what things will sound like, what works etc. So after learning and practicing all these things they can become second nature to you, so you don't have to constantly analyze what you're playing. Then when performing music and improvising SOME people (even though they know their theory) find it easier to just play by feel (which is based on their knowledge of theory, among other things such as influences. they're just not thinking about it constantly while they're performing) It's just a matter of preference and again, neither way is right or wrong...it's about resullts.

Agreed?
#17
Quote by Stash Jam
well to elaborate I already said you should learn all the theory you possibly can. Study it, practice it, talk about it etc... that gives you a great idea of what things will sound like, what works etc. So after learning and practicing all these things they can become second nature to you, so you don't have to constantly analyze what you're playing. Then when performing music and improvising SOME people (even though they know their theory) find it easier to just play by feel (which is based on their knowledge of theory, among other things such as influences. they're just not thinking about it constantly while they're performing) It's just a matter of preference and again, neither way is right or wrong...it's about resullts.

Agreed?



I dont think ONE SINGLE guitarist or musician, ANYWHERE, is in a constant state of thought when they are jamming, all of the time.

Do I start thinking about it when that key change, or the m7b5 chord comes up, or when we need some harmony, or when I want to voice lead, or anything like that? Yes, most often!

No way is better, one is just logical the other is not.


https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=538404

Go there if you haven't yet. We've been through anything you are going to bring up.
Don't tell me what can not be done

Don't tell me what can be done, either.



I love you all no matter what.
#18
Quote by nightwind
I dont think ONE SINGLE guitarist or musician, ANYWHERE, is in a constant state of thought when they are jamming, all of the time.

Do I start thinking about it when that key change, or the m7b5 chord comes up, or when we need some harmony, or when I want to voice lead, or anything like that? Yes, most often!

No way is better, one is just logical the other is not.


https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=538404

Go there if you haven't yet. We've been through anything you are going to bring up.



cool I think there was just some miscommunication in this thread.

I really don't care
#19
All theory does is allow you to easily communicate with other players, so that you can quickly describe what you are playing. It doesn't stop what you play at all.
#20
Quote by Xerk
I just went over do my fathers house the other day because he got a new Mesa Boogie tube amp. Thing sounds so crisp and yummie. Playe some stuff that sounds a lot like The Ventures.

Anyway, he's knows almost no music theory, not even what key. But he was playing in, the proper major/minor scales/keys every time switching between blues, gypsie, pentatonic and other types of scales AND modes when needed. Knows NOTHING about theory! It blows my mind how awesome the human mind is. I watched his solo's and lead and they followed every rule but it came straight from the heart.

This makes me afraid to focus *TOO* much on theory, so I've decided to still play mostly by feel, but to learn everything I can about theory so I understand what I feel and can jam with other musicians. Does this seem like the standard best way?

Woah, woah woah... He knows scales AND modes?

The reason he is playing the correct scales is because his ear knows what the scales are. Nothing to do with "feel".
I'm not going to discuss theory because most people seem to already know that it DOESN'T make you any less of a player, all I'll say is when studying history, you dont get any worse by studying maths aswell.
Originally posted by WlCmToTheJungle "you have just received the amish computer virus. Since the amish dont have computers it's based on there honor system so please delete all of your files immediatly. thank you