#1
Inspired by Leonheart's thread in the pit, i decided to come to the jazz forum and ask if any body here is a fan.

i'll give a few examples.

John Zorn
Coltrane (later era)
Bitches' Brew era Miles (debatable)
Jaga Jazzist

any more you could add?
#2
I'm listening to Bitches Brew now. Everybody i know calls it fusion, but if you called it avant garde i guess i could see where you're coming from. I picked up a copy of (ex-Miles Davis and ex-Eric Dolphy) drummer Tony Williams lp Lifetime (not the band Tony Williams Lifetime with John McLaughlin) yesterday on Blue Note from 1964. The original liner notes say it is the first avant-garde release on Blue Note. Eric Dolphy did some avant-garde stuff on Blue Note and Prestige around the same time, check out Dolphy's Out To Lunch. Also check out Freejazz by Ornette Coleman.
I haven't heard any John Zorn, i saw a copy of Naked City yesterday, but spent my hard earmed on Tony Williams and also the new John McLaughlin album "Industrial Zen"- well worth the wait- there was even a track with Vinnie Colauita (ex-Zappa drummer) that sounded like something off of Frank Zappa's Jazz From Hell.
Anyway, is what is considered avant-garde today, going to be considered avant-garde tomorrow? Take Bitche's Brew for example, at the time, it was so far out, people would have to have been calling it avant -garde, but now we call it fusion.
Writing about music is like dancing about architecture
#3
naked city is pretty good, i have it. though i'll admit i prefer his klezmer album i have...then again, i prefer klezmer to A-G

but you should definately check it out. does a mean version of the bond theme.

and since Avant-Garde means front guard, there is no way the avant-garde of today can still be considered the same down the line.

think of it as a balloon, and avant garde is the air pressing against the boundaries.

where the air was before isnt going to be where it is as it gets bigger.
#4
Does Charles Mingus' The black saint and the sinner lady fall under avant-garde? I'm pretty sure it does... and that just might be the best album i've ever heard. And Let my children hear music is another good one of his that i think falls under avant-garde.

I'm also quite fond of Eric Dolphy (the earlier mentioned Out to lunch is great).

John Zorn is pretty cool, but i'm personally more fond of things like Masada (klezmer/jazz) than his spazzed out stuff such as Naked City. And while we're talking about that: Masada is good, but when it comes to the combo of klezmer and jazz, i prefer Estradasphere (the best band you never heard). If you're into klezmer as well as jazz and don't mind unconventional music, i guarantee you will love Estradasphere (youtube vid).
#5
definately have to give them a shot.

and i have zorn's filmworks VIII and the circle maker.

brilliant klezmer.

but thanks for estradasphere, i like them.

are you a fan of DeVotchKa?
#6
Never heard of them. But their allmusic page looks interesting. Thanks for the tip, i'll check it out.
#7
definately...if i think of more i'll share.

also i found this guy, Henri Texier.

reminds me of avant-garde but done by just a trio basically.

well, sounds like a trio. not entirely sure.
#9
How can you talk about Avant-Garde and not mention Cecil Taylor, Joe Harriott and John Cage?

Some other more recent good ones are Evan Parker, Han Bennink, Peter Brötzmann, Alexander Von Schlippenbach, Paul Lovens and Derek Bailey.
He who joyfully marches to music in rank and file has already earned my contempt.
He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would fully suffice.


Remember: A prudent question is one half of wisdom.

Click.
#11
Not as much.
He who joyfully marches to music in rank and file has already earned my contempt.
He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would fully suffice.


Remember: A prudent question is one half of wisdom.

Click.
#12
yeah, i'm not a "fan" of glass but i really respect him.

and i cant believe 4.33 is on youtube
#13
Cuong Vu plays some awesome Avant Garde stuff.. (With the odd rock/funk line thrown in for good measure)


For sale: Early 1985 Ibanez AH10 (Allan Holdsworth signature model) PM for details
#14
Quote by power freak
Cuong Vu plays some awesome Avant Garde stuff.. (With the odd rock/funk line thrown in for good measure)




Ahah
He who joyfully marches to music in rank and file has already earned my contempt.
He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would fully suffice.


Remember: A prudent question is one half of wisdom.

Click.
#15
My cousin is in an avant-garde band called shot-x-shot (my cousin is the drummer). They play in the philedelphia area. He gave me a CD of theirs. The first time I listened to it it was really tough (I had never listened to avant-garde before), but I really do appreciate the inprovisation and musical aspects of it.

Heres is their website:
http://www.shotbyshotmusic.com/

and their myspace:
http://www.myspace.com/shotxshot
#17
Rashied Ali Quartet
Albert Ayler
Masayuki Takayanagi & New Direction
Keiji Haino
Sun Ra
Haazz & Company
Youngs & Neilson
#18
Tim Buckley is not the first guy you'd expect in the blues/jazz forum, but one of his albums is heavily rooted in jazz, is all about experimentation and progression and sounds like nothing else.
Considering the fact that it was released only a year after Miles Davis officially jumpstarted the jazz/rock fusion style with Bitches Brew, and elaborates on the concept of a rock/jazz combo, but at the same time exists completely in its own universe and sounds like none of the other jazz/fusion pioneers, i think it definitely deserves a place in this thread. Even today, it still sounds completely unique. Just imagine what it would have sounded like in 1970...

Tim Buckley - Starsailor



Quote by allmusic.com
After his beginnings as a gentle, melodic baroque folk-rocker, Buckley gradually evolved into a downright experimental singer/songwriter who explored both jazz and avant-garde territory. Starsailor is the culmination of his experimentation and alienated far more listeners than it exhilarated upon its release in 1970. Buckley had already begun to delve into jazz fusion on late-'60s records like Happy Sad, and explored some fairly "out" acrobatic, quasi-operatic vocals on his final Elektra LP, Lorca. With former Mother of Invention Bunk Gardner augmenting Buckley's group on sax and alto flute, Buckley applies vocal gymnastics to a set of material that's as avant-garde in its songwriting as its execution. At his most anguished (which is often on this album), he sounds as if his liver is being torn out -- slowly. Almost as if to prove he can still deliver a mellow buzz, he throws in a couple of pleasant jazz-pop cuts, including the odd, jaunty French tune "Moulin Rouge." Surrealistic lyrics, heavy on landscape imagery like rivers, skies, suns, and jungle fires, top off a record that isn't for everybody, or even for every Buckley fan, but endures as one of the most uncompromising statements ever made by a singer/songwriter.

Youtube clip of Starsailor-opener Come Here Woman


If you want it, you'll have to download it though: for some reason it's been out of print for ages, and a used copy will set you back between $75 and $150. I do believe it's available at the iTunes store, but that has DRM and i assume most of us don't like that.
#19
Starsailor is a sensation album.

I'm with Resiliance, Cecil Taylor is a must. Jazz Advanced is probably his most accessible record, and a great place to start.

I also reccomend Peter Brotzmann is you are feeling adventurous, aswell as Don Byron who is a demon on the clarinet.
Don't be derivative. Explore...
#20
I recently downloaded The Lounge Lizards self-titled cd; it's kinda like Naked City but with no grindcore. Their guitarist, Marc Ribot is one ****ed up guy; I'm not sure if I preferred him on Tom Waits' Rain Dogs, but this shit gets ****ing crazy, whereas everything on Rain Dogs was at least somewhat musical.

I like Naked City a little bit, but find myself enjoying the songs with less... nonsense. Also, Mike Patton's Mr. Bungle has some avant-garde jazz strewn about, and they're very cool for those who haven't heard them before. I guess I like avant-garde jazz in theory, but when listening, it usually starts to grate really fast.
#22
Quote by n0selfesteem
I recently downloaded The Lounge Lizards self-titled cd; it's kinda like Naked City but with no grindcore. Their guitarist, Marc Ribot is one ****ed up guy; I'm not sure if I preferred him on Tom Waits' Rain Dogs, but this **** gets ****ing crazy, whereas everything on Rain Dogs was at least somewhat musical.

I like Naked City a little bit, but find myself enjoying the songs with less... nonsense. Also, Mike Patton's Mr. Bungle has some avant-garde jazz strewn about, and they're very cool for those who haven't heard them before. I guess I like avant-garde jazz in theory, but when listening, it usually starts to grate really fast.


:p

marc ribot is one of John Zorn's guitarists iirc.