#1
My band needs an amp for our singer, but we only have guitar amps. Is it ok to plug a microphone in a guitar amp? (its a vox ad15vt)
i just asked this because i thought that maybe its not built for sudden changes, say from singing to screaming.
#2
You could do it, it would sound bad, you might blow the speaker, and it wouldn't be loud, but it works.
#3
u guys dont have a cheaper amp??? i dont think it would mess it up but i wouldnt want to try it............ but no it doesnt matter too much
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#4
we do have a cheaper amp, we just need an amp with an equalizer because the singer needs his basses pushed up.
#5
i tried it through my crate half stack (ugh) and my voice was all distorted/gainy. works alright through an acoustic amp, like the acoustasonic though.
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#6
You'll be fine it'll just sound like garbage because you won't have a tweeter to get that full range sound, and the preamp is designed for a guitar. Other than that it will do.
Last edited by take_it_t at Mar 10, 2007,
#7
I asked my teacher and he said to use a PA system to plug the mic in. At my drummers house, we used his dad's old Fender bass stack thingy and got that squeely feedback if you like, turn it up past conversation level. So instead of breaking it, we put the mic away.
#8
Quote by RPGoof
I asked my teacher and he said to use a PA system to plug the mic in. At my drummers house, we used his dad's old Fender bass stack thingy and got that squeely feedback if you like, turn it up past conversation level. So instead of breaking it, we put the mic away.


i prolly had to do with the amp placement too. if the amp was behind you, you got the feedback because your mic was pointing at the amp. thats all feedback is, is when an amp makes a sound the mic picks it up directly and it amplifies it again and the mic hears it again and amplifies it again and so on.

still, prolly not a good idea quality-wise to put vocals throught a guitar/bass amp
#9
from what ive heard, bass amps will be better for vocals than guitar amps. and keyboard amps are better still. personally ive done a guitar amp, which wasnt horrible, and used the line in of a stereo system. the stereo had some ok speakers and actually sounded better than the guitar amp. didnt get great volume and it started to get mushy if you turned it up too loud, but it does work. it isnt ideal, and i wouldnt recomend it for any type of performance. if all you are doing is practicing, you should be ok, but definatly dont use it for any time of show.
#10
i do it for recording sometimes, since i like to use my amps spring reverb on my voice, it works if you have the right vocal range and EQ it right.
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#11
what kind of amp/speakers does a singer normally use?
we might get those, because i googled up my problem and found on lotsa sites that plugging the mic into a guitar amp can blow it because vocals have lower frequencies or something
#12
Yes, guitar amps' speakers can't take the low frequencies of the voice. It's much like plugging a bass into a guitar amp.
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#13
Well, it's going to be some sort of mic preamp generally a mixer plugged into a power amp plugged into a speakers, generally consisting of a driver and a tweeter to get the full range.

Blowing a speaker is usually going to occur with a power overload, since speakers have a certain rating, however if it is a stock speaker with an amp it will probably be rated appropriately to the power amp. I wouldn't be so worried about blowing anything the way you are using it.