#1
So I have a 16 bar jazz solo for jazz band. Now soloing is very natural to me, and its not a problem, however I have to solo for a performance. And this is the biggest jazz festival in the province, so I really want to shine and get noticed by people.

Now the song is Chameleon. Most of you jazz buffs know this song by Herbie Hancock. The chords I am soloing over couldnt be easier. It switches between Bb minor and Bb minor/Eb.

Now the question is what scale or mode should I use to solo. This is a bright, upbeat funk song for those of you who dont know. The performance is next week friday, so any tips at all are extremely appreciated.
Quote by funkdaddyfresh
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#2
Bb minor seems most logical. You dont have to have it sound dark just because it is a minor scale, its all in how you play it. If you wanted, you could do C dorian, which would probably make it sound more up-beat.

EDIT: didnt mean to say C dorian, i was thinking as if it were at Bb major. Bb dorian would suit best, with the best resolve, as said below.

www.all-guitar-chords.com

on that site, theres a section where you can let it play some chords and you can solo over them. I'd experiment with it to figure out how you want to make it sound.
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Last edited by 6DgOfInTb at Mar 9, 2007,
#3
Quote by justin_fraser
So I have a 16 bar jazz solo for jazz band. Now soloing is very natural to me, and its not a problem, however I have to solo for a performance. And this is the biggest jazz festival in the province, so I really want to shine and get noticed by people.

Now the song is Chameleon. Most of you jazz buffs know this song by Herbie Hancock. The chords I am soloing over couldnt be easier. It switches between Bb minor and Bb minor/Eb.

Now the question is what scale or mode should I use to solo. This is a bright, upbeat funk song for those of you who dont know. The performance is next week friday, so any tips at all are extremely appreciated.


I do think that if you want to SHINE, don't stick to a scale...
Of course you can use the Bb minor scale to be on the safe side...
#4
i would go with Bb Dorian. ^^^ the Db in the Bb minor chord would clash with the D natural of the C dorian
hmmmm...
#5
Quote by yan_kong
I do think that if you want to SHINE, don't stick to a scale...
Of course you can use the Bb minor scale to be on the safe side...


Thats the thing. I dont want to use Bb minor because i want to spice it up a little. Maybe even change scales in the middle of the solo. I dont know, just looking for suggestions.
Quote by funkdaddyfresh
justin, that was easily the most inspiring, helpful piece of advice anyone has ever given me in regards to my musical pursuits.


Screaming Help
#6
there are multiple minor based scales you could use. Hell, you could even use Bb minor pentatonic to lead into some other scales. All you have to do is make sure that the notes in the scale you are using don't clash with the notes that the rest of the band will be playing
hmmmm...
#7
Maybe switching between Bb dorian, and some Bb melodic minor. The melodic minor will sound a little outside, so overusing it might not work, but if you look you've got chromatic stuff from maj6-minor7-major7-root, if you mix the scales. So you could do some sequence type stuff where you play an idea starting on the maj6, and chromatically work your way up to the root (or away from the root).

This is just one idea that isn't explained very well, but I've seen you post and you seem to know what you're doing, so I'm sure you could do something with that if you wanted. Also, you can use melodic minor to outline the V(7) of Bbm, then go to the i, even though there's no actual V.


Other things to keep in mind... more sophisticated improv builds on itself, it isn't just a collection of licks. Little motifs, sequences, bits of the tune's melody, things like that are your friends. Take an idea, build on it, take it somewhere.
(Slightly outdated) Electronic and classical compositions by m'self: Check 'em out
#8
haha, I had to solo for my Jazz band at a concert. We did this song called "The Judge," and it sounded alot like Texas Flood. I know it might sound easy and cheap, but all I can tell you man...is.. The Blues Scale, works every time!

Member Q-Tron of the EHX Users Guild
#9
Quote by psychodelia
Maybe switching between Bb dorian, and some Bb melodic minor. The melodic minor will sound a little outside, so overusing it might not work, but if you look you've got chromatic stuff from maj6-minor7-major7-root, if you mix the scales. So you could do some sequence type stuff where you play an idea starting on the maj6, and chromatically work your way up to the root (or away from the root).

This is just one idea that isn't explained very well, but I've seen you post and you seem to know what you're doing, so I'm sure you could do something with that if you wanted. Also, you can use melodic minor to outline the V(7) of Bbm, then go to the I, even though there's no actual V.


Other things to keep in mind... more sophisticated improv builds on itself, it isn't just a collection of licks. Little motifs, sequences, bits of the tune's melody, things like that are your friends. Take an idea, build on it, take it somewhere.


Ya that does all make sense. I often use chromatics in my solos and it surprisingly sounds good.

But just to make sure on the middle paragraph, how would I go about outlining the V with the melodic minor? Like just focus on it a bit more or what?

Thanks man.
Quote by funkdaddyfresh
justin, that was easily the most inspiring, helpful piece of advice anyone has ever given me in regards to my musical pursuits.


Screaming Help
#10
Well, you have Bb melodic minor: Bb C Db Eb F G A Bb.

The V of Bbm is F. And, in the melodic minor, you have all the notes required: F A C (Eb too, if you want a dominant 7th). So you can arpeggiate F(7) using the melodic minor, and then "resolve" to the i.

Hope that makes sense.
(Slightly outdated) Electronic and classical compositions by m'self: Check 'em out
#11
The notes we need are:
Bb, Db, F and Eb.

We could have:

Bb Minor, Harmonic Minor, Dorian, Phrygian, Melodic Minor, Dorian b2 and many more... switch 'em up, have fun with them.

If you want something bright then maybe something along the lines of Melodic Minor or Dorian.
DANNY

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#12
Quote by psychodelia
Well, you have Bb melodic minor: Bb C Db Eb F G A Bb.

The V of Bbm is F. And, in the melodic minor, you have all the notes required: F A C (Eb too, if you want a dominant 7th). So you can arpeggiate F(7) using the melodic minor, and then "resolve" to the i.

Hope that makes sense.


Ohhh gotcha. Ok sweet deal thanks man.
Quote by funkdaddyfresh
justin, that was easily the most inspiring, helpful piece of advice anyone has ever given me in regards to my musical pursuits.


Screaming Help